Calls for Papers: Curriculum of the body and the school as clinic: Histories of public health and schooling, 1900-2020

We have provisional approval from a commercial press for an international edited book provisionally titled, Curriculum of the body and the school as clinic: Histories of public health and schooling, 1900-2020.

The book’s focus is outlined below as well as our proposed timeline for author submissions. We welcome proposals for chapters that will be 6,000-8,000 words in length.

We particularly welcome submissions from:

[1] Early and early-mid-career scholars, whether as sole, lead or co-author; and,

[2] Scholars who have not previously published extensively in English.

Book Overview

Title: Curriculum of the body and the school as clinic: Histories of public health and schooling, 1900-2020

This international edited collection employs the concept of the ‘curriculum of the body’ (Burns, Proctor & Weaver, 2020) to distinguish a set of educational technologies, schooling practices and school-based public health programmes that have been enacted on or through the body of children and young people—not in isolation but rather “in permanent interdependence with other beings and objects” (Veiga, 2018, p. 22). The collection focuses on the twentieth century, with some chapters likely to extend into the first decades of the twenty-first. Our intention is to delineate a period during which the belief that every child should spend several years in school gained near universal global agreement, no matter the variations in local provision and practice. Additionally, this was a period in which the imperatives of public health became increasingly systematized and bureaucratized and schools were identified as key sites nationally and internationally for health and welfare interventions (Proctor & Burns, 2017). The rationale for the time period and institutional focus is to pay attention to the development of a set of institutional forms, repertoires of expertise, and bodily practices that became normalized and naturalized as elemental to schooling—and thereby to childhood and adolescence.

The book is informed by an expanded view of curriculum that recognizes that the school curriculum encompasses not just the content or transmission of formal syllabuses, but rather a whole range of teaching and learning that goes on, both in accordance with and despite of the stated or unstated objectives of schoolteachers and other authorities.

The collection will describe a set of consequential encounters between modern schooling, (public) health discourse and the bodies of children by mapping key dimensions of the ‘curriculum of the body’. It is a curriculum in that there is a level of coherence and direction to its practices, which are instructional in nature, even if not always at the level of transparent or even consciously articulated planning by school authorities. This coherence and direction occur despite the lack of a monolithic center of power, despite this curriculum being untidily put together from various different parts of the operation and forms of schooling, and despite both instances and patterns of inconsistency and contradiction.

The situating of this bodily curriculum in modern schooling draws attention to the historical significance of the institutionalization of education, across the twentieth and into the twenty-first centuries. Schooling is theorized as one of the great organizing institutions of modernity, which, in the case of the curriculum of the body, coexisted and intersected with contemporarily emerging fields of authority, knowledge and organization in medicine, public health and developmental psychology. Schools became so closely identified with first childhood and then adolescence that the artificiality of this connection is now scarcely visible. Modern categorizations of childhood and adolescence grew interactively with the expansion of modern, classroom-based schooling, and occasioned new beliefs and practices of corporeal management, protection and discipline.

The collection is organized into four subsections that outline a range of dimensions and practices that collectively constitute the curriculum of the body in modern schooling. We are seeking chapters that critically reflect on the ways in which, since about 1900, the bodies of children and young people have been discursively constructed and materially implicated in and through the formal and informal technologies and practices of curriculum in different places. Each thematic subsection demonstrates how the curriculum of the body was shaped by the broader values and norms governing particular places at particular points in time. They also highlight the key authorities and dominant bodies of knowledge instrumental in establishing childhood during the schooling years as a period of physical vulnerability in need of management. While recognizing that the practices and effects of any kind of curriculum, or set of curricular practices, will always to some extent be messy, contested or inconsistent, the collection sections establish themes and continuities.

The book subsections four key elements of the curriculum of the body, which organize the collection of chapters into subsections: (1) Formal programmes; (2) Clinical practices; (3)Architecture, spatialities, and materialities; (4) Classroom pedagogies and disciplinary practices. Each subsection will contain three-four chapters. Under these headings we additionally invite contributors to address the collection’s unifying theme – the historical making of childhood and youth in relation to the historical making of systematized and institutionalized expert knowledge.

We have written two papers together offering an expanded idea of our purpose in theorising schools as clinics, and in focussing on the corporeal in the school curriculum and would be happy to send PDF versions to anyone who would like further information about the kind of work we are envisaging, or who is generally interested:

Burns, K., Proctor, H., Weaver, H. (2020). Modern schooling and the curriculum of the body. In Tanya Fitzgerald (Eds.), Handbook of Historical Studies in Education: Debates, Tensions, and Directions, (pp. 1-21). Singapore: Springer.

Proctor, H., Burns, K. (2017). The connected histories of mass schooling and public health. History of Education Review, 46(2), 118-124

Interested contributors are invited to submit a chapter proposal (about 1000 words including bios) to Dr Kellie Burns (kellie.burns@sydney.edu.au) and A/Prof Helen Proctor (helen.proctor@sydney.edu.au) including the following information:

1. Proposed chapter title

2. Conceptual/ theoretical focus

3. Empirical research base / details of the research

4. Proposed thematic link to the collection under one of the four subsections listed above.

5. Brief author bios and/or links to an institutional web page, Google Scholar profile or equivalent (as mentioned above, we are keen to encourage work from new and emerging scholars as well as from scholars who have not previously been read extensively in English).

Proposed timeline:

Abstracts due: 31 March 2021 (or sooner)

Contributors notified: 15 April 2021

Full (6,000-8,000 word) chapter due: 30 November 2021

Reviews and editing, editors’ introductory essay completed November 2021-May 2022 as needed.

Book manuscript submitted: June 2022

Contact Info:  Dr Kellie Burns, University of Sydney, kellie.burns@sydney.edu.au

Associate Professor Helen Proctor, University of Sydney, helen.proctor@sydney.edu.au

Calls for Papers: Hidden Histories: Women and Science in the Twentieth Century

HIDDEN HISTORIES: WOMEN AND SCIENCE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

Organizers: Dr. Amelia Bonea (University of Heidelberg) & Dr Irina Nastasă-Matei (University of Bucharest)

7-8 May 2021

Submission deadline: 15 January 2021

The twentieth century has often been hailed as a period when women became important in science, but their participation in scientific inquiry and practice often remains buried, quite literally, in the footnotes of specialist publications and studies of the history of science. Even today, national statistics about women in science are not always easily available. The data that does exist suggests there is significant regional and cultural variation in how women engage with science globally. Recent UNESCO surveys, for example, point to a contrast between the former Soviet republics of Central Asia, where almost half of the researchers employed in science are female, and East, South and West Asia, where that proportion drops significantly to 23 percent or less. Similarly, in Eastern European countries female researchers tend to be better represented in science fields than their Western European counterparts. Perhaps ironically, that relationship is reversed when we turn our attention to studies of the history of science in the twentieth century: the scientific pursuits of women in Western contexts have consistently enjoyed more visibility than those in regions like Africa, Asia or Eastern Europe. The Biographical Dictionary of Women in Science (2000) is emblematic of these trends, listing as it does a mere 17 scientists from India, China and Japan, as opposed to more than 500 from Great Britain, and featuring entries up to the 1950s, a period that roughly overlaps with decolonization in Asia.

This two-day virtual conference, accompanied by a roundtable discussion, brings together scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds to address two main, interrelated questions:

  • How did women contribute to the making and communication of scientific knowledge in the twentieth century?
  • How do we study the history of women in science during this period?

We begin from the premise that encounters with science happened in a multitude of settings and that statistical data, while essential, provides only a superficial insight into the myriad experiences of women in science and, indeed, what science itself meant in different regional and cultural contexts. Our aim is to move beyond the popular ‘heroine’ model to investigate the many hidden figures who worked not only as professional scientists, but also at the periphery and even outside of scientific communities as lab technicians, amateur scientists, school teachers, librarians, journalists or science writers. In so doing, we hope to raise new questions and formulate new methods for writing the history of women in science. What, for example, do textbooks, forgotten footnotes in scientific papers, conversations about female colleagues in male scientists’ correspondence or photographs of Indian women toiling at archaeological sites teach us about the history of women in science?

Possible topics include:

  • Gender and the historiography of science: theories, methods and archives
  • Pedagogy of science: government policies around science and education, women in tertiary education, science clubs, science in the home, science education in religious institutions
  • Cultures of scientific practice: laboratories, fieldwork, secondary school teaching, scientific instruments, relationship between professional and amateur science
  • Scientific communication: scientific periodicals, mass media and science journalism, museum work, popular science writing, photography, the arts
  • Representations of women and gender in science
  • Women and scientific networks: personal and professional networks, associational culture

Keynote speakers: Prof Mariko Ogawa (Mie University) & Prof Andrea Pető (CEU)

We welcome contributions from both experienced and early career scholars. We encourage especially scholars working in/on countries and regions that are less represented to apply, in order to promote a global dialogue on this matter. Please send your proposals for 20-minute papers (abstracts of max. 300 words), along with a brief biographical note, to womeninscience2021@gmail.com by the deadline of 15 January 2021. Successful applicants will be notified by 15 February 2021. The conference will be held virtually via Zoom or heiCONF and participants will have the option of presenting their papers live or in pre-recorded format. For queries please do not hesitate to contact the organizers at the above email address.

Contact Info: Dr Amelia Bonea (University of Heidelberg) & Dr Irina Nastasă-Matei (University of Bucharest) womeninscience2021@gmail.com

Fellowships: History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine at the University of Cambridge

Postgraduate funding opportunities in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine at the University of Cambridge, 2021-22

The Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge is the largest of its kind in the UK, and has an unrivalled reputation for teaching and research. Staff have expertise in the history and philosophy of a wide range of sciences and of medicine.

If you are interested in studying for an MPhil or PhD in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine at Cambridge, you will find everything you need to know about the Department, the courses, the academic staff https://www.people.hps.cam.ac.uk/index, and the application process on our website https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate.

The Department offers two MPhil options: an MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/mphil-hpsm and an MPhil in Health, Medicine and Society https://www.hms.hps.cam.ac.uk/ (taught jointly with Social Anthropology and Sociology) as well as the PhD https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/phd.

For those considering a PhD, the Department will hold an online workshop on Friday 6 November at 2-3pm on Zoom as part of the University’s Virtual Postgraduate Open Days. Led by the Director of Postgraduate Studies, the workshop will explain our admissions requirements and procedures. Advice will be provided on finding a workable topic and potential supervisors, writing a convincing proposal, securing references and applying for funding. To book a place on the Open Days, please go to https://www.postgraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/events/postgraduate-open-day. To see the sorts of careers our PhD students go into, see https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/phd/placement-record.

Students applying to start an MPhil or PhD in 2021-22 have access to the following studentship opportunities:

Cambridge Trust Scholarships
Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Studentships
Gates Cambridge Scholarships (international round)
HPS Trust Fund Bursaries for all MPhil and PhD students
Wellcome Trust Awards: for HMS MPhil and PhD (students with a focus on human or animal health). If you wish to be nominated for one of these awards please indicate this on your application form.

To be eligible for an award you will need to submit your postgraduate application by 12 noon GMT on 3 December 2020.

All applicants will automatically be considered for an HPS Trust Fund Bursary. Initial offers of funding will be made in March, and awards will continue to be allocated until the application deadline has been reached, or all the available funding has been committed.

For more information on these and other awards available through the Department, please visit https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/funding.

For more general information on funding opportunities available to postgraduate students at the University of Cambridge: https://www.postgraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/funding.

For further information about postgraduate study at HPS in Cambridge: hps-admin@lists.cam.ac.uk

Prizes: 6th Notes and Records Essay Award

Calling all historians of science – enter the 6th Notes and Records Essay Award

 Are you a researcher in the history of science, technology and medicine? Have you completed a postgraduate degree within the last five years? If the answer to these questions is ‘yes’, you can enter our Essay Award for a chance to win £500 (or local currency equivalent) and publication of your winning essay in our history of science journal Notes and Records. One runner-up will also receive £250 and there will be £100 prizes for an additional three ‘honourable mentions’. All winning categories will benefit from a free online subscription to Notes and Records for one year. Deadline for entries is 28 February 2021. Further information available at https://royalsocietypublishing.org/rsnr/essay-award

Notes and Records reports on current research and archival activities across the history of science, technology and medicine. Our Essay Award is open to researchers from the above fields who have completed a postgraduate degree within the last 5 years.  Please also see our blog about the previous winner/winning entry from 2019 at https://royalsociety.org/blog/2020/09/notes-and-records-essay-award-2021/

The award consists of:
A cash prize of £500
A runner-up prize of £250
Three honourable mentions will each receive £100
Publication of the winning entry in Notes and Records

All winners will receive a one year online subscription to Notes and Records

Lectures: Pandemic Perspectives: Stories through Collections

Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History is announcing a new program series, Pandemic Perspectives: Stories through Collections.

Join curators and historians for an engaging series of panels offering perspectives on the current pandemic. Panelists will virtually share objects from the past as a springboard to a lively discussion of how to better understand the present. Audience questions are encouraged and will be addressed in the moderated dialogue.

Website, including (free) registration for each program: https://americanhistory.si.edu/pandemic-perspectives

We invite curious people to join us for interesting discussions exploring a diverse range of historical and contemporary topics – and tensions – associated with pandemics.

Fellowships: Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine

The Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine invites applications for fellowships in the history of science, technology and medicine, broadly construed. Opportunities include:
  • NEW: Four-Month NEH Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • Nine-Month NEH Postdoctoral Fellowship
  • Dissertation Fellowships
  • Fellowships-in-Residence
The four-month NEH Postdoctoral Fellowship will normally be awarded to a senior scholar, and the nine-month NEH Postdoctoral Fellowship to a junior scholar. Dissertation Fellowships are available to graduate students working on a PhD dissertation. Fellowships-in-Residence are available to scholars with other sources of support. For details, please see Fellowship Overview.

The Consortium comprises 26 educational and cultural institutions using their exceptional resources to promote academic and public understanding of the history of science, technology and medicine.

The Consortium offers rich opportunities for research. Taken together, its collections of rare books, manuscripts and artifacts are unparalleled in historical depth as well as breadth. The Consortium also provides a vibrant, stimulating and collegial community. Fellows participate in public and scholarly events, as well as informal reading and writing groups, held online and at the Consortium’s offices in downtown Philadelphia.

Visit our website at www.chstm.org for further information, including an online application form and a list of current and past fellows. The website also features: information about the fellowship programs of member institutions; descriptions of the exceptional collections in the museums, archives, and libraries of the Consortium; and a Consortium-wide search hub for rare books and manuscripts.

The Consortium will hold an informational meeting via Zoom at 12:00 PM EDT Friday, September 25, 2020 to answer questions about fellowship opportunities and the application process. Please register for the meeting here.

Applications must be submitted online by December 15, 2020.

Calls for Papers:

SAHMS is seeking paper, panel, and roundtable proposals for its 2021 virtual conference, to be hosted by Emory University on March 11-13. We welcome abstracts on a broad range of topics from any period in the history of science, medicine, and technology, and encourage submissions from graduate students, faculty, professionals, and independent scholars. We especially invite submissions that address global histories, as well as those related to the histories of disability, race, gender, or the environment. Presentations on public history, digital history, museums, the medical humanities, or teaching are also welcome.

Topics do not need to be Southern in focus and presenters do not need to be affiliated with Southern academic institutions.

Please submit your proposals via the SAHMS website by December 1, 2020.

All of our 2021 conference sessions and events will be held online. Presented papers may also be published in the conference’s proceedings or invited for submission to the organization’s journal. For additional information about the meeting and submission guidelines, please see our website: www.sahms.net. Questions can be emailed to sahmsconference@gmail.com.

Fellowships: Postgraduate funding opportunities in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine at Cambridge, 2021-22

Postgraduate funding opportunities in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine at the University of Cambridge, 2021-22

** US applicants, please note the early deadline (14 October) for Gates Cambridge Scholarships, which are available for PhD and MPhil **

The Department of History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Cambridge is the largest of its kind in the UK, and has an unrivalled reputation for teaching and research. Staff have expertise in the history and philosophy of a wide range of sciences and of medicine.

If you are interested in studying for an MPhil or PhD in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine at Cambridge, you will find everything you need to know about the Department, the courses, the academic staff <https://www.people.hps.cam.ac.uk/index>, and the application process on our website <https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate>.

The Department offers two MPhil options: an MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine <https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/mphil-hpsm> and an MPhil in Health, Medicine and Society <https://www.hms.hps.cam.ac.uk/> (taught jointly with Social Anthropology and Sociology) as well as the PhD <https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/phd>.

For those considering a PhD, the Department will hold an online workshop as part of the University’s Virtual Postgraduate Open Days, which run from 2 to 15 November. Led by the Director of Graduate Studies, the workshop will explain our admissions requirements and procedures. Advice will be provided on finding a workable topic and potential supervisors, writing a convincing proposal, securing references and applying for funding. To book a place on the Open Days, please go to <https://www.postgraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/events/postgraduate-open-day>. To see the sorts of careers our PhD students go into, please see <https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/phd/placement-record>.

Students applying to start an MPhil or PhD in 2021-22 have access to the following studentship opportunities:

Cambridge Trust Scholarships
Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) Studentships
Gates Cambridge Scholarships
HPS Trust Fund Bursaries for all MPhil and PhD students
Wellcome Trust Awards: for HMS MPhil and PhD (students with a focus on human or animal health) If you wish to be nominated for one of these awards please indicate this on your application form.

To be eligible for these awards you will need to submit your postgraduate application by 12 noon on 3 December 2020. (US Gates candidates have a deadline of 14 October.)

All applicants will automatically be considered for an HPS Trust Fund Bursary. Initial offers of funding will be made in February, and awards will continue to be allocated until the application deadline has been reached, or all the available funding has been committed.

For more information on these and other awards available through the Department, please visit <https://www.hps.cam.ac.uk/study/postgraduate/funding>.

For more general information on funding opportunities available to postgraduate students at the University of Cambridge: <https://www.postgraduate.study.cam.ac.uk/funding>.

For further information about graduate study at HPS in Cambridge: hps-admin@lists.cam.ac.uk

Fellowships: History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

The Consortium for History of Science, Technology and Medicine invites applications for fellowships in the history of science, technology and medicine, broadly construed. Opportunities include:

NEW: Four-Month NEH Postdoctoral Fellowship
Nine-Month NEH Postdoctoral Fellowship
Dissertation Fellowships
Fellowships-in-Residence

The four-month NEH Postdoctoral Fellowship will normally be awarded to a senior scholar, and the nine-month NEH Postdoctoral Fellowship to a junior scholar. Dissertation Fellowships are available to graduate students working on a PhD dissertation. Fellowships-in-Residence are available to scholars with other sources of support. For details, please see Fellowship Overview.

The Consortium comprises 27 educational and cultural institutions using their exceptional resources to promote academic and public understanding of the history of science, technology and medicine.

The Consortium offers rich opportunities for research. Taken together, its collections of rare books, manuscripts and artifacts are unparalleled in historical depth as well as breadth. The Consortium also provides a vibrant, stimulating and collegial community. Fellows participate in public and scholarly events, as well as informal reading and writing groups, held online and at the Consortium’s offices in downtown Philadelphia.

Visit our website at www.chstm.org for further information, including an online application form and a list of current and past fellows. The website also features: information about the fellowship programs of member institutions; descriptions of the exceptional collections in the museums, archives, and libraries of the Consortium; and a Consortium-wide search hub for rare books and manuscripts.

The Consortium will hold an informational meeting via Zoom at 12:00 PM EDT Friday, September 25, 2020 to answer questions about fellowship opportunities and the application process. Registration is required. Please see the link at the bottom of this announcement.

Applications must be submitted online by December 15, 2020.

For more information, go to:
https://www.chstm.org/news/senior-junior-postdocs-dissertation-fellowships-2021-22

Jobs: Professor or Associate Professor and serve as the Director of the Eleanor Crowder Bjoring Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry (ECBCNHI), University of Virginia

The posting number is:  R0016298

The University of Virginia (UVA) School of Nursing invites applications for an established senior scholar to join the faculty at the rank of Professor or Associate Professor and serve as the Director of the Eleanor Crowder Bjoring Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry (ECBCNHI). The ECBCNHI is dedicated to the preservation and study of nursing history and its contributions to the shaping of the American health care system. This distinctive position requires an eminent historian of nursing who will have opportunities to work with faculty, staff, and students in schools and departments across UVA Grounds. They will support an environment that openly and honestly values difference and allows room for a rich variation of perspectives, beliefs, experiences, and people. The Director of the ECBCNHI will provide leadership in all of these important areas.

The ECBCNHI is one of only two endowed nursing history centers in the world. It hosts a regular series of nursing history forums, sponsors an annual Agnes Dillon Randolph Award and lecture, awards annual research fellowships, and publishes a biannual newsletter, Windows in Time. It hosts scholars from around the world. To learn more about the center please visit our website: https://www.nursing.virginia.edu/nursing-history/

Many professional schools in the health sciences – including medicine, public health, and public policy – have individual faculty whose expertise is in the history of the health sciences. The ECBCNHI, housed in the School of Nursing, is one such center. It is recognized internationally for its innovative educational programs and cutting edge research in the history of nursing. It has been successful in garnering grant support, with its faculty generating numerous award-winning scholarly publications and presentations and serving as officers of national nursing history associations.

To be considered candidates must be a distinguished historian of nursing with a substantial independent body of research work. This includes publication in peer-reviewed journals (usually single or lead authored), a track record of extramural funding, and publication of academic monographs or books with university presses. Their research must be based on sound methodology that presents both argument and analysis and must be rigorously executed such that it pushes the boundaries of the field. The candidate must also have evidence of invited lectures and presentations at national and international conferences.

We are seeking a master teacher with at least five years of teaching experience who demonstrates a passion for creating a collaborative scholarly and pedagogical environment to support students and faculty. Candidates must have a PhD in nursing, history, or other relevant field; and if a nurse, be eligible for licensure in the state of Virginia. Joint appointments with other schools or departments within the University of Virginia may be possible.

Rank and salary will be determined on qualifications and years of experience. Endowed Chair appointments are possible for highly qualified applicants who meet the School of Nursing criteria. Candidates must be able to meet the criteria for the UVA tenured process of Associate or Professor.

Ranked among the top nursing schools in the nation by US News and World Report, UVA aims to create a diverse community of students, scholars, and staff who aspire to achieve excellence in education, research, and clinical experiences. The UVA School of Nursing has been actively engaged in IDEA, our Inclusion, Diversity and Excellence Achievement initiative. We are deeply committed to developing a community that is inclusive, respectful, and considers diversity to be a key part of our excellence. We seek applicants whose experience, research, and teaching have prepared them to substantially contribute to this mission. We welcome, in particular, applicants from groups who have been historically underrepresented in nursing, including racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ+, veterans, people with disabilities, and men.

The selected applicant will be required to complete a background check prior to their first day of employment per University policy.

TO APPLY:

PROCESS FOR INTERNAL UVA APPLICANTS: Please apply through your Workday Home page, search “Find Jobs”, and search for “R0016298″.   Complete an application online and see below for documents to attach.

PROCESS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICANTS: Please visit UVA job board https://uva.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/UVAJobs, (R0016298) complete the application and see below for documents to attach.  Please note that multiple documents can be uploaded in the box or you can combine them into one PDF.

Complete an application online and attach:

    • CV/Resume
    • Cover Letter