Jobs: Professor or Associate Professor and serve as the Director of the Eleanor Crowder Bjoring Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry (ECBCNHI), University of Virginia

The posting number is:  R0016298

The University of Virginia (UVA) School of Nursing invites applications for an established senior scholar to join the faculty at the rank of Professor or Associate Professor and serve as the Director of the Eleanor Crowder Bjoring Center for Nursing Historical Inquiry (ECBCNHI). The ECBCNHI is dedicated to the preservation and study of nursing history and its contributions to the shaping of the American health care system. This distinctive position requires an eminent historian of nursing who will have opportunities to work with faculty, staff, and students in schools and departments across UVA Grounds. They will support an environment that openly and honestly values difference and allows room for a rich variation of perspectives, beliefs, experiences, and people. The Director of the ECBCNHI will provide leadership in all of these important areas.

The ECBCNHI is one of only two endowed nursing history centers in the world. It hosts a regular series of nursing history forums, sponsors an annual Agnes Dillon Randolph Award and lecture, awards annual research fellowships, and publishes a biannual newsletter, Windows in Time. It hosts scholars from around the world. To learn more about the center please visit our website: https://www.nursing.virginia.edu/nursing-history/

Many professional schools in the health sciences – including medicine, public health, and public policy – have individual faculty whose expertise is in the history of the health sciences. The ECBCNHI, housed in the School of Nursing, is one such center. It is recognized internationally for its innovative educational programs and cutting edge research in the history of nursing. It has been successful in garnering grant support, with its faculty generating numerous award-winning scholarly publications and presentations and serving as officers of national nursing history associations.

To be considered candidates must be a distinguished historian of nursing with a substantial independent body of research work. This includes publication in peer-reviewed journals (usually single or lead authored), a track record of extramural funding, and publication of academic monographs or books with university presses. Their research must be based on sound methodology that presents both argument and analysis and must be rigorously executed such that it pushes the boundaries of the field. The candidate must also have evidence of invited lectures and presentations at national and international conferences.

We are seeking a master teacher with at least five years of teaching experience who demonstrates a passion for creating a collaborative scholarly and pedagogical environment to support students and faculty. Candidates must have a PhD in nursing, history, or other relevant field; and if a nurse, be eligible for licensure in the state of Virginia. Joint appointments with other schools or departments within the University of Virginia may be possible.

Rank and salary will be determined on qualifications and years of experience. Endowed Chair appointments are possible for highly qualified applicants who meet the School of Nursing criteria. Candidates must be able to meet the criteria for the UVA tenured process of Associate or Professor.

Ranked among the top nursing schools in the nation by US News and World Report, UVA aims to create a diverse community of students, scholars, and staff who aspire to achieve excellence in education, research, and clinical experiences. The UVA School of Nursing has been actively engaged in IDEA, our Inclusion, Diversity and Excellence Achievement initiative. We are deeply committed to developing a community that is inclusive, respectful, and considers diversity to be a key part of our excellence. We seek applicants whose experience, research, and teaching have prepared them to substantially contribute to this mission. We welcome, in particular, applicants from groups who have been historically underrepresented in nursing, including racial and ethnic minorities, LGBTQ+, veterans, people with disabilities, and men.

The selected applicant will be required to complete a background check prior to their first day of employment per University policy.

TO APPLY:

PROCESS FOR INTERNAL UVA APPLICANTS: Please apply through your Workday Home page, search “Find Jobs”, and search for “R0016298″.   Complete an application online and see below for documents to attach.

PROCESS FOR EXTERNAL APPLICANTS: Please visit UVA job board https://uva.wd1.myworkdayjobs.com/UVAJobs, (R0016298) complete the application and see below for documents to attach.  Please note that multiple documents can be uploaded in the box or you can combine them into one PDF.

Complete an application online and attach:

    • CV/Resume
    • Cover Letter

Calls for Papers: Narratives and Mental Health

Call for Contributions to an essay collection to be submitted with Brill, for the new book series Narratives and Mental Health

Ed. Katrin Röder & Cornelia Wächter

This volume explores the history of English, American and Anglophone literary representations of mental distress and its medical investigation and treatment as significant parts of the cultural heritage of psychiatry since the Middle Ages. In line with Aleida Assmann’s approach, the volume perceives cultural heritage as ‘that part of the material and immaterial cultural memory that has been selected and destined for active transfer and circulation’ (2020, 9, transl. K.R.). The Cultural Heritage of Psychiatry and Its Literary Transformations: Middle Ages to the Present (working title) will approach the cultural heritage of psychiatry as a complicated gift that not only connects the past to the present and the future but also links different national and regional cultures in a globalized world (Mills/Fernando 2014; Mills 2014; Fernando 1991). Like all forms of cultural heritage and functional memory, the cultural heritage of psychiatry calls for a responsible use of its components, for their preservation and protection against damage and suppression as well as for perpetual transformation, renewal and change (Assmann: 2013, 330; 2020, 9).

The cultural heritage of psychiatry is often regarded as problematic, Eurocentric, difficult and burdensome, not least because of the long history of medicalization, institutionalized confinement, constraint and abuse of ‘patients’/’users’ and its suppression of western and non-western alternative forms of caring (Foucault 1988; Showalter 1985; Reaume 2010; Lewis 2010; Mills/Fernando 2014; Mills 2014; Punzi 2019, 243-244, 248-249; Punzi/Röder 2019, 197-201). While all cultural heritage is selective and incomplete (Assmann 2008, 106), the fragmentariness of the heritage of psychiatry is to a considerable degree the result of processes of social, political and rhetorical exclusion, that is, of the silencing, suppression, stigmatization, moral condemnation and invalidation of ‘patients’’/’users’ voices/self-presentations in different periods of (inter-/trans-)cultural and intellectual history (Foucault 1988, passim; Showalter 1985, passim; Mills/Fernando 2014; Punzi 2019; Guest Pryal 2010, 479-480).

In this context, literature is assigned a preeminent role as ‘the mnemonic art par excellence’ (Lachmann 2008, 301). As a reintegrative interdiscourse, it simultaneously creates and observes memory, representing a ‘body of commemorative actions that include the knowledge stored by a culture, and virtually all texts a culture has produced and by which a culture is constituted’ (ibid.; Erll 2008, 391). Hence, practices of writing, reading and creative appropriation revolving around the topics of mental distress/madness and forms of treatment performatively construct the cultural memory and cultural heritage of psychiatry. They interact with extant cultural texts in diverse ways, e.g. through convergence, divergence, interrogation, assimilation or repulsion (Lachmann 2008, 301; Neumann 2008, 334, 337-338; Paris 2017). In these interactions, intertextuality plays a central role because it ‘demonstrates the process by which a culture […] continually rewrites and retranscribes itself […]’ (Lachmann 2008, 301).

The planned volume will explore how literary texts shape the cultural memory and heritage of psychiatry, how they discuss dominant and alternative forms and traditions of treatment and care and how they bear witness to and fragmentarily retrieve/imagine suppressed, medicalized voices, thereby producing counter-cultural memories (Saunders 2008, 327). By investigating the interdependence and complex interaction between literary and non-literary texts in their historical and (inter-/trans-)cultural contexts, the anthology will emphasize the close connection between history and cultural heritage that was often either neglected or questioned in the past (Assmann 2020, 10).

By integrating the perspective of critical heritage studies, this volume will interrogate collective forms of cultural identity and literary canon formation with regard to what is forgotten, rejected and excluded (Assmann 2020, 10). It perceives the cultural heritage of psychiatry as a dynamic, globalized, dissonant process that is relative to as well as formative of changing and fragmentary systems of value and significance (Wells 2017).

Although there is a comprehensive body of recent and prevailing book-length studies about the relationship between English, American and Anglophone literature, psychiatric discourse and conceptions of madness/mental distress in specific periods, genres and historical and cultural contexts (e.g. Rogers 2019; Crawford 2019; Gaedtke 2017; Whitehead 2017; Stanback 2016; Iseli 2015; Dickson/Ingram 2012; Ingram/Sim/Lawlor et al. 2011; Sedlmayr 2011; Veit-Wild 2006; Neely 2004; Lange 1997; Ziolkowski 1990; Showalter 1985), investigations of the practices of remembering the cultural heritage of psychiatry in relation to historical changes and inter-/trans-cultural interactions in the representation of mental distress and its treatment remain a desideratum. This volume seeks to provide central insights into these topics.

We invite chapters (each with a length of ca. 7000 words) exploring the following questions:

  • How do literary texts from different periods of literary history interact with the history and cultural heritage of psychiatry and with the cultural representations of mental distress in their specific historical moments and (inter-/trans-)cultural contexts (e.g. through intertextuality, imaginative appropriation)?
  • How do they bear witness to, negotiate, criticize, challenge, suppress, imaginatively re-configurate, transform and re-invent this heritage?
  • How do literary texts problematize the relationship between memory, heritage, forgetting, fragmentation and suppression?
  • How do they represent the heritage of psychiatry and the cultural imaginary of mental distress in ways that make this heritage relevant for their present and their envisaged future?

Each chapter should start with a concise overview of concepts and discourses of mental distress/madness and the heritage of psychiatry in the respective period(s) of literary and (inter-/trans-)cultural history. Thereafter, chapters should provide an analysis of selected literary texts (one or more, any genre) with regard to their techniques of representing and remembering (or not remembering/withholding/suppressing) conceptions of mental distress/madness and psychiatric treatment in their respective historical and (inter-/trans-) cultural context. Whenever possible, an analytical focus should be placed on the ways in which these selected texts perform intertextual exchanges with conceptions and representations of mental distress and its treatment from their respective (inter-/trans-)cultural past or on the ways in which the texts imagine concepts of mental distress, treatment and care for the (globalized) future. Discussions of intersectional relationships between concepts of mental distress/madness, psychiatric treatment and gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, race and migrant identities should be included.

Please send your abstract (500-600 words) to kroeder@uni-potsdam.de or cornelia.waechter@rub.de by 1 September 2020.

Congratulations to the 2020 AAHM Award Winners!

Congratulations to the 2020 AAHM award winners announced at the Associations’ virtual business meeting on May 9, 2020.

William Osler Medal: Daniel Huang of Queens University  School of Medicine for his paper, “Cyber Solace: Historicizing an Online Forum for Depression 1990-1999.”

Richard H. Shryock Medal Honorable Mention: Brad Bolman of Harvard University for his essay, “In the Animal House: Salvage, Rabies, and Labor in Birmingham”

Richard H. Shryock Medal Honorable Mention: Sara Ray of the University of Pennsylvania for her paper, “Origin Stories: Mothers, Midwives, and Monstrous Births”

Richard H. Shryock Medal: Emer Lucey of the University of Wisconsin-Madison for her essay,“Beauty and Joy: The Aesthetics of Autism and Down Syndrome”

Fielding H. Garrison Lecturer for 2021: Janet L. Golden, Professor Emerita Rutgers University

J. Worth Estes Prize: Sabrina Minuzzi for her article, “‘Quick to say Quack’ Medicinal Secrets from the Household to the Apothecary’s Shop in Eighteenth-century Venice,” in Social History of Medicine.

Jack D. Pressman-Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Development Award in 20th Century History of Medicine or Biomedical Sciences Award: Dr. Wangui Muigai Assistant Professor at Brandeis University to support her Book Project, “Infant Death in the Black Experience”

George Rosen Prize: Guillaume Lachenal for his bookThe Lomidine Files: The Untold Story of a Medical Disaster published by Johns Hopkins University Press.

William H. Welch Medal: Nicole Barnes for her book Intimate Communities: Wartime Healthcare and the Birth of Modern China, 1937-1945 published by the University of California Press.

Genevieve Miller Lifetime Achievement Award: Theodore M. Brown

Congratulations to all our winners.

AAHM News: Statement on COVID-19

The officers of the American Association for the History of Medicine are monitoring the spread of COVID-19, and its implications for our annual meeting.  Many professional organizations have cancelled upcoming meetings.  The officers are reviewing statements issued by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and are in close contact with the AAHM Local Arrangements and Program Committees.  As of March 10, 2020, the officers and the committees have elected not to cancel the meeting and to continue to follow developments with COVID-19.

It is quite possible that decisions made by the University of Michigan, City of Ann Arbor, State of Michigan, and various federal agencies may take the decision about the annual meeting out of the Association’s hands. As of March 10, 2020, none of the above-mentioned entities have restricted domestic travel or forbidden large meetings.

Some members may want to wait before making a decision to attend the annual meeting. AAHM will make refunds without penalty to all who register if the meeting is cancelled. AAHM also will refund those who have registered and later decide they cannot attend. The AAHM will be flexible about its requirement to register by April 7 for people who appear on the program. In addition, we have waived the late fee so that individuals can register until April 30 at the early registration rate. Our meeting hotels, the Kensington and the Even will hold our reserved room blocks until April 24, 2020.

The AAHM Officers and the Local Arrangements and Program Committees will send another notification to all members and those who have registered for the annual meeting by March 31, or sooner if events warrant.

Susan Lederer

AAHM President

Fellowships: Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine

The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is pleased to announce applications are open to its Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine, supporting research onsite at the NLM in its historical collections.

The NLM Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine provides up to $10,000 to support onsite research in the historical collections of the National Library of Medicine, which span ten centuries, encompass a variety of digital and physical formats, and originate from nearly every part of the globe. The collections also include the Michael E. DeBakey papers—representing the diverse areas in which DeBakey made a lasting impact, such as surgery, medical education, and health care policy—along with the papers of many other luminaries in science and medicine.

Anyone over the age of eighteen, of any academic discipline and status, who has not previously received this Fellowship may apply. Non-U.S. citizens may apply. Group applications should be submitted under the name of a single principal researcher.

For details about the application process and required documents, please visit this website dedicated to the Fellowship.

To apply for the NLM Michael E. DeBakey Fellowship in the History of Medicine, visit the online application portal.

To receive consideration, all required materials must be submitted to the Foundation for Advanced Education in the Sciences (FAES), via the online application portal, by midnight EDT, September 25, 2020. Selected fellows will be notified and awards will be announced in December.

For further information about the materials available for historical research at the National Library of Medicine, please visit https://www.nlm.nih.gov/hmd/index.html, or contact the NLM’s History of Medicine reference desk by email at NLM Customer Support or by phone 301-402-8878.

The Fellowship was established in 2016 and is supported by The DeBakey Medical Foundation, in honor and memory of Michael E. DeBakey (1908–2008), a legendary American surgeon, educator, and medical statesman. During a career spanning 75 years, his work transformed cardiovascular surgery, raised medical education standards, and informed national health care policy. He pioneered dozens of operative procedures such as aneurysm repair, coronary bypass, and endarterectomy, which routinely save thousands of lives each year, and performed some of the first heart transplants. His inventions included the roller pump (a key component of heart-lung machines) as well as artificial hearts and ventricular assist pumps. He was a driving force in building Houston’s Baylor University College of Medicine into a premier medical center, where he trained several generations of top surgeons from all over the world. He was a visionary supporter of the NLM, playing a pivotal role in its transformation from the Armed Forces Medical Library in the 1950s, in the establishment of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine in the 1960s, in launching NLM’s outreach initiatives in the 1990s, and in promoting the digitization of its indexes to pre-1960s journal articles.

AAHM News: Orals Bibliographies for Students

The AAHM is updating its repository of bibliographies. This repository is a tool to aid graduate students who are building readings lists in preparation for their qualifying examinations in fields related to the History of Medicine.

We are especially seeking new contributions related to the following categories:
– Health Activism
– Disability History
– Drug/Pharmaceutical History
– Gender, Reproduction, and Sexuality in Medicine
– Public Health
– Medical Ethics
– Race and Medicine
– Medical/Health Humanities
– Homeopathy/Alternative Medicine
– Miscellaneous
These categories are permeable in nature and only represent a general grouping, rather than strict sub-disciplinary divisions. That being said, we welcome a variety of types of comp lists that speak to the History of Medicine or Medical/Health Humanities.
If you would like to contribute your exam book list to the repository, please email it in .pdf form to the Chair of the Education and Outreach Committee, Claire Clark (claire dot clark at uky dot edu). We ask that you redact all personally identifying information (i.e. your name, institution, and examiner).

Fellowships: New York Academy of Medicine 2020

Applications are currently being accepted for the 2020 cycle of The New York Academy of Medicine Library’s two history of medicine fellowships: the Paul Klemperer Fellowship in the History of Medicine and the Audrey and William H. Helfand Fellowship in the History of Medicine and Public Health.  Information about the two residential fellowships, along with application materials and instructions for applying, can be found here: https://www.nyam.org/awards-grants/library-fellowships/

For questions about the application process or the collections contact:  Arlene Shaner, MA MLS |  Historical Collections Librarian Library,
212.822.7313 office | ashaner@nyam.org

Congratulations to the 2019 AAHM Award Winners

The American Association for the History of Medicine honored the following individuals at its award ceremony on April 27, 2019 in Columbus, Ohio, TN as part of the 92nd annual meeting:

Osler Medal: Tiffany Kay Brocke, Johns Hopkins University, “Race and Reputation: The Influence of the Johns Hopkins Hospital on Abortion Access in Baltimore, 1945-1973.”; Honorable mention: Christopher Magoon, University of Pennsylvania, “Mao’s Pacifist ‘Friends’: The Friends Ambulance Unit and the Limits of Medical Humanitarianism in China”

Shryock Medal: Kevin George McQueeney, Department of History, Georgetown University, “The City That Care Forgot: The Long Civil Rights Struggle Over African American Health and the Perpetuation of Apartheid Healthcare in Twentieth Century New Orleans”; Honorable mention: Spencer J. Weinreich, Department of History, Princeton University, “Legal and Medical Authority in the Newgate Smallpox Experiment (1721)”

J. Worth Estes Prize:Aimee Medeiros and Elizabeth Siegel Watkins, “Live Longer Better: The Historical Roots of Human Growth Hormone as Anti-Aging Medicine, Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences 73 (3 2018): 333-359

Pressman-Burroughs Wellcome: Joelle Abi-Rached, Columbia University

George Rosen Prize: Sarah Leavitt, curator “Architecture of an Asylum: St Elizabeth’s 1852-2017”, National Building Museum, Washington, DC

Welch Medal: Pablo Gómez, The Experiential Caribbean: Creating Knowledge and Healing in the Early Modern Atlantic (University of North Carolina Press, 2017)

Genevieve Miller Lifetime Achievement Award: Jacalyn Duffin

The Garrison Lecturer for 2020: Evelynn M. Hammonds, Chair, Department of the History of Science, the Barbara Gutmann Rosenkrantz Professor of the History of Science and Professor of African and African American Studies, Harvard University

Lectures: Online CME in the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

The Department of the History of Medicine at Johns Hopkins is proud to introduce new online Continuing Medical Education modules that provide a historical perspective on issues of relevance to clinical practice today.

For more information on these CME modules entitled “Professionalism in Historical Context” and “History of Global Health,” visit https://www.hopkinshistoryofmedicine.org/content/online-cme-modules-history-medicine-0.