Jobs: University of Michigan Departments of Women’s Studies and History, Faculty position

History of Gender and Health. The University of Michigan’s Departments of Women’s Studies and History seek qualified applicants for a jointly-appointed assistant professor tenure-track, or professor at the rank of associate or full with tenure, in the history of gender and health. We seek candidates with scholarly expertise and teaching experience and interests in the history of gender and health in non-U.S. locations such as East Asia, Mexico, Central America, or Africa.  The ideal candidate will have demonstrated an ability to implement a multidisciplinary approach that includes history and women’s/gender/feminist studies. Related interests may include: science, technology, and society studies; sexuality studies; ethnic and/or area studies; environmental history; health care; or intersectionality.

This is a university-year appointment with an expected start date of September 1, 2019. Interested applicants are required to hold a Ph.D. degree prior to the appointment in women’s studies, history or related disciplines. Applicants must demonstrate evidence of excellence in both teaching and research.

Candidates should submit a digital application dossier via email attachment (in PDF format) to WS-History-Search2018@umich.edu.  Applicants should provide: • Cover letter addressed to Chair of the History of Gender and Health Search Committee • Curriculum Vitae • Statement of current and future research plans • Writing sample (no more than 25 pages) • Statement of teaching philosophy and experience (or a teaching portfolio containing such a statement) • Evidence of teaching excellence (i.e., student evaluations of teaching, course syllabi, teaching awards that can be part of a teaching portfolio) In addition, candidates should provide three letters of recommendation, which should be sent directly to WS-History-Search2018@umich.edu from the signer’s (or credentialing service’s) institutional email address.  Deadline to apply for full consideration for the position is October 1, 2018. The search committee will begin reviewing applications on October 8, 2018, and will continue until an appointment is made.  Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Michigan is supportive of the needs of dual career couples and is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer.

Jobs: Women’s Studies Lecturer III, University of Michigan

Women’s Studies Lecturer III Posting—Gender and Health

The Department of Women’s Studies in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts at the University of Michigan seeks applicants for a full-time (100%) Lecturer III position to begin January 1, 2019, pending final authorization.  This is a non-tenure track position with a university-year appointment.

Duties and responsibilities for this Lecturer III position are expected to include teaching courses in our Gender and Health major and minor. The lecturer will offer a mix of courses in Women’s Studies that will complement our existing strengths and contribute to our departmental mission. We are especially interested in applicants who can teach large lecture courses on women’s health as well as smaller seminars in specific areas related to gender and health.  In addition to teaching, the candidate’s responsibilities will include providing assistance with the outreach, program coordination, and advising for students who have declared a major or a minor in Gender & Health. The lecturer also will serve as the principal academic advisor for students with a major or a minor in Gender & Health. The selected candidate will work with the departmental leadership team to create programming that will build community and facilitate communication and sharing of information among our undergraduates. Additional departmental service responsibilities may be assigned.

We expect that a successful candidate will hold a PhD in Gender, Sexuality, or Women’s Studies or a related field, and have expertise in an area of Gender & Health.  The ideal candidate will demonstrate subject matter expertise and teaching excellence about gender, sexuality, race, class, and disability in relation to healthcare, health policies, and/or health activism. Candidates should have a commitment to teaching students about inequalities in health care systems. Demonstrated excellence in teaching and engagement with diverse student populations will be an important criterion in our selection process. We expect that the applicant will be a visible and engaged faculty member in the department. We are seeking a broad range of applicants with training or experience in the fields of Gender, Sexuality, or Women’s Studies.

Terms and conditions of employment for this Lecturer III position are subject to the provisions of a Collective Bargaining Agreement between the University of Michigan and the Lecturers’ Employee Organization (LEO). This is a nine-month position (i.e., runs September 1 through May 31 each year), with salary paid over a 12-month period, and is benefits-eligible. The initial appointment will be for one academic year. The possibility of renewal is contingent on performance, department need, and future funding.

Please apply online (posting #160817 on http://careers.umich.edu/). Questions regarding problems with application upload to WS-Lecturer@umich.edu. Candidates should submit a single attachment (in PDF format) to the online posting system with the following required materials:

  1. Letter of Application (no more than two pages)
  1. Curriculum Vitae
  1. Teaching Statement (includes teaching philosophy and experience in no more than five pages)
  1. Evidence of Teaching Excellence
  1. Two sample syllabi (from courses previously taught)
  1. Names and contact information of three recommenders who can comment on the applicant’s qualifications for this position. Letters are not required in the initial application submission stage.

The application deadline for full consideration is September 10th, 2018. We hope to extend an offer no later than, if not before, December 14, 2018.

Offers for this appointment are contingent on successful completion of a background screening.

Women and minority candidates are encouraged to apply. The University of Michigan is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.

 

Digital Media & Humanities Editor for the Bulletin of the History of Medicine

The Bulletin of the History of Medicine is seeking nominations for a Digital Media & Humanities Editor to manage this section of the journal, which will appear in two of the publication’s four issues per year. The Digital Media & Humanities Editor will identify physical and online exhibits, films, and other media of interest to our readers, and solicit the appropriate scholars to write such reviews for the Bulletin. The Editors would consider appointing co-Editors to this section; this position is unpaid. The ideal candidate(s) will hold a Ph.D. in the history of medicine or a related field and have expertise in digital humanities. All nominations will be held in confidence. Kindly send names of nominees to the editors at bhm@jhmi.edu by September 1, 2018.

Prizes: Spurgeon H. Neel Annual Award

The Army Medical Department Museum Foundation is pleased to sponsor the 2018 Spurgeon Neel Annual Award competition for the article of 5000 words or less that best exemplifies the history, legacy, and traditions of the Army Medical Department.

Named in honor of Major General (Retired) Spurgeon H. Neel, first Commanding General of Health Services Command (now U.S. Army Medical Command), the award competition is open to all federal employees, military and civilian, as well as non-governmental civilian authors who submit manuscripts for publishing consideration.

The AMEDD Museum Foundation will present a special medallion award and a $1000 monetary prize to the winner, who will be notified in advance, at a Foundation-sponsored event early in 2019.

All manuscripts must be submitted to the AMEDD Museum Foundation, Amedd.Foundation@ameddmuseum.org , by 30 November 2018. At the time of submission, a manuscript must be original work and not pending publication in any other periodical. It must conform to the Writing and Submission Guidance of the AMEDD Journal, and must relate to the history, legacy and/or traditions of the Army Medical Department. Manuscripts will be reviewed and evaluated by a six-member committee appointed by the President of the AMEDD Museum Foundation. The winning manuscript will be selected in December 2018.

Additional detail concerning the Spurgeon Neel Annual Award may be obtained by contacting Mrs. Sue McMasters at the AMEDD Museum Foundation, 210-226-0265.

Conferences: “Health History: Beyond Borders”, University of Auckland, New Zealand

“Health History: Beyond Borders”, 3-7 December 2019, University of Auckland, New Zealand.

We cordially invite members of the AAHM to attend the biennial conference of the Australian and New Zealand Society of the History of Medicine in December 2019. This conference will be located in Auckland, New Zealand. Whilst New Zealand is far removed geographically from the epicentre of many significant past medical developments, we believe it is important to view the history of health and medicine in a broad international perspective, with ideas and systems taking on different forms in different contexts. It is this intersection between the local and international which will form the major theme of our conference. We welcome papers from all areas of the history of health and medicine, including health systems, public health, indigenous health, mental health, women’s health, child health, biography, hospital history and nursing history. Call for papers will open in November 2018. For further information see our website: http://anzshm2019.org/, or contact the conference convener, Professor Linda Bryder, l.bryder@auckland.ac.nz

Calls for Papers: The Faces of Depression in Literature

The Faces of Depression in Literature

The NIMH (National Institute of Mental Health) defines depression as a common but serious mood disorder that causes severe symptoms (asthenia, anhedonia, abulia, among many others) that affect how you feel, think, and handle daily activities, such as sleeping, eating, or working. The cause is believed to be a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors and affects approximately 216 million people (3% of the world’s population) mostly ranged from 20 to 30 years old. Nowadays, depression is also known for its many synonyms: clinical depression, MDD (Major Depressive Disorder), unipolar depression, unipolar disorder, depressive episode, and recurrent depressive disorder, to name a few. However, literary expressions gather the many names and faces that shaped this widespread and well-known disorder throughout history, especially when mental health treatises were scarce. Thus, it is common to find the background of modern depression linked to concepts such as the Greeks aegritude (θλίψη, aegritudo) and black bile (μέλαινα χολή, melaina chole), the Latin acedia and taedium vitae, the Renaissance tristitia and melancholia, as well as the modern ennui, spleen, mal de vivre, nausée, noia, Weltschmerz… all of which have been present in the literary works of all times.

This seminar attempts to bring together specialists and scholars in the topic from a multidisciplinary approach to explore the many literary expressions of depression over time and discuss about their approximations to current, clinical understanding of MDD, i.e., their similarities and differences, taking into account the environmental and psychological factors on which such a mental disorder depends in each historical period. Our goal is to clarify the background of depression by paying attention to its representation through literature and revalue literature itself as a means of acquiring knowledge in an interdisciplinary way.

Current ACLA guidelines specify that each ACLA member* may submit only ONE PAPER for consideration. Individuals interested in participating in this seminar are encouraged to be in touch with the organizer over the summer; paper submissions through the portal will open Sept. 1 and close Sept. 21. Seminar organizer will review all submitted papers and propose their rosters by October 5th.

* If your proposal is accepted, you must become an ACLA member ($45-195 USD, depending on your current salary) and register for the Annual Meeting ($35-195 USD, depending on your academic status) to present your paper and receive a certificate. However, you can apply for a very easy to get Travel Grant of $200 USD.

https://www.acla.org/faces-depression-literature

Fellowships: Mellon/ACLS Scholars and Society Fellowships

The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) is pleased to announce a new initiative to advance publicly engaged scholarship in the humanities. The Mellon/ACLS Scholars & Society program, made possible by a grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will support humanities scholars who seek to partner with nonacademic organizations in their research and encourage innovation in doctoral education at their universities.

Inspired by the Mellon/ACLS Public Fellows program, which demonstrates the dynamic value of doctoral education by placing recent humanities PhDs in top nonprofit and government organizations, the Scholars & Society program will encourage faculty to explore connections between humanities research and broader society while in residence at a US-based cultural, media, government, policy, or community organization of their choice. The fellowships also provide resources and training that will enable fellows to incorporate best practices of public scholarship into doctoral education on their campuses. ACLS developed the program in consultation with academic and nonprofit leaders with extensive experience in the realm of publicly engaged scholarship.

“Just as ACLS strives to increase funding for core humanities research through a variety of fellowship and grant programs, we also recognize the urgent need to promote the broader circulation of that knowledge across all sectors of society,” said John Paul Christy, director of public programs at ACLS. “We look forward to supporting scholars who can be ambassadors for the humanities beyond their campus communities, and who will instill an ethos of reflective public engagement in their scholarship for years to come.”

The fellowships are open to faculty who hold tenured positions in PhD-granting departments or programs at universities in the United States. In the pilot year of the program, ACLS will award 12 fellowships for the 2019-20 academic year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $75,000, plus funds for research, travel, and related project and hosting costs.

The goal of the fellowship year should be a major research project in the humanities or humanistic social sciences that treats a significant issue in society, such as democratic governance; technological change; racism and inequality; environmental change; economic exclusion; or migration and immigration, to name just a few possibilities. Fellows will select host organizations based on their capacity to advance their research.

Fellows will participate in two workshops over the course of the fellowship year. These workshops will encourage collaboration between scholars and organizations engaged in public scholarship and will support institution-building efforts to train humanities faculty and doctoral students who are interested in developing research agendas that have purchase both inside and outside of the academy.

Proposals must be submitted through ACLS’s online application system, which will begin accepting applications in late July. Further information about the program, including eligibility criteria and FAQ, is available online here. The application deadline is October 24, 2018.

Contact: fellowships@acls.org

Calls for Papers: Representing Abortion

Call for papers: Representing Abortion
Edited by Rachel Alpha Johnston Hurst

Deadline for proposals: October 1, 2018
Email: rahurst@stfx.ca

Rosalind Pollack Petchesky argued in 1987 that “feminists and other prochoice advocates have all too readily ceded the visual terrain,” abandoning the field of fetal imagery to antiabortion activists (264).  She called for new fetal images that “recontextualized the fetus” (Petchesky 1987, 287).  Such images would locate the fetus in a body (and a social context) outside of what Carol A. Stabile would later describe as “an inhospitable waste land, at war with the ‘innocent person’ within” that is a dominant theme in antiabortion discourse (1992, 179).  Recently, Shannon Stettner wrote that although there are more ordinary stories about abortion circulating as a political response to threats to abortion access, they are typically anonymous and online, and so it remains a reality that “we are still a long way from a world in which women will not feel obliged to conceal the fact that they had an abortion” (2016, 7).  Even in circumstances that support access to abortion, abortion can remain a secret: invisible and unheard.

How do we represent abortion?  What work does representing abortion do?  Can representing abortion challenge and change conventional reproductive rights understandings of abortion that circulate publicly?  Will reclaiming representations of abortion help publicly express the “things we cannot say” about abortion from a pro-choice perspective, like grief and multiple abortions (Ludlow 2008, p. 29)?  Alternatively, does taking back control of representing abortion from antiabortion activists provide a space to “celebrate” abortion as a central component of reproductive justice (Thomsen 2013, 149)?  This edited collection begins from these questions to consider how artists, writers, performers, and activists create space to make abortion visible, audible, and palpable within contexts dominated by antiabortion imagery centred on the fetus and the erasure of the person considering or undergoing abortion.  This collection will build on the recent exciting proliferation of scholarly work on abortion that investigates the history, politics, and law of abortion, as well as antiabortion movements and experiences of pregnancy loss (Haugeberg 2017; Johnstone 2017; Lind & Deveau 2017; Sanger 2017; Saurette & Gordon 2016; Smyth 2016; Stettner 2016; Stettner, Burnett, & Hay 2017; Watson 2018).  Central to the considerations in this proposed collection is the intellectual and political work that these artworks, texts, performances, and actions do and make possible.  Contemporary and historical analyses are welcomed.

Some possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • “ordinary” stories about abortion told through a variety of media (e.g. “The Abortion Diaries Podcast” by Melissa Madera; various blogs and websites like “My Abortion. My Life”)
  • abortion memoirs (e.g. Marianne Apostolides’ Deep Salt Water; Kassi Underwood’s May Cause Love: An Unexpected Journey of Enlightenment After Abortion)
  • visual art (e.g. Laia Abril’s On Abortion; Paula Rego’s The Abortion Pastels)
  • making the abortion procedure visible, audible, and palpable in abortion support services (e.g. offering the option to view products of conception; abortion support zines)
  • activist art and performance (e.g. the Abortion Caravan in Canada; Chi Nguyen’s “5.4 MILLION AND COUNTING” quilt in Texas; Maria Campbell’s mixed media art on Prince Edward Island; Heather Ault’s travelling graphic art exhibit4000 Years for Choice; #RepealThe8th protest art in Ireland)
  • plays (e.g. Julia Samuels’ I Told My Mum I Was Going On An RE Trip; Jane Martin’s Keely and Du)
  • films (e.g. Poppy Liu’s Names of Women; Tracy Droz Tragos’ Abortion: Stories Women Tell)

To submit a proposal for inclusion in this collection, please submit a 500 word abstract, a working title, and a 100 word biographical statement to rahurst@stfx.ca.  Proposals must be received on or before October 1, 2018.  Full papers will be invited no later than November 1, 2018, and the abstracts will be used to prepare a book proposal to be submitted to refereed academic publishers.  Complete manuscripts will be due on June 1, 2019, so they can be revised by October 1, 2019 to submit to the publisher.

Fellowships: New York Academy of Medicine Klemperer and Helfand Fellowships

Applications are currently being accepted for the 2019 cycle of The New York Academy of Medicine Library’s two history of medicine fellowships: the Paul Klemperer Fellowship in the History of Medicine and the Audrey and William H. Helfand Fellowship in the History of Medicine and Public Health.  Information about the two residential fellowships, along with application materials and instructions for applying, can be found here:  https://www.nyam.org/awards-grants/library-fellowships/

Questions about the fellowships or the application process may be directed to me.

Arlene Shaner, MA MLS
Historical Collections Librarian
212.822.7313 office

The New York Academy of Medicine
LIBRARY
1216 Fifth Avenue | New York, NY 10029

Lectures: Online CME in the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

The Department of the History of Medicine at Johns Hopkins is proud to introduce new online Continuing Medical Education modules that provide a historical perspective on issues of relevance to clinical practice today.

For more information on these CME modules entitled “Professionalism in Historical Context” and “History of Global Health,” visit https://www.hopkinshistoryofmedicine.org/content/online-cme-modules-history-medicine-0.