Garrison Lecture

About the Garrison Lecture

The Garrison Lecturer, a scholar distinguished for contributions to medical history or other fields of science and learning, presents original and previously unpublished research in a lecture given at the Association’s annual meeting.

The Garrison Lecturer for 2018 is Julie Fairman, Professor of Nursing, Professor, Department of History and Sociology of Science, Chair, Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences, Endowed Chair, Nightingale Professor in Honor of Nursing Veterans, Co-Director, RWJF Future of Nursing Scholars Program, University of Pennsylvania

Garrison Lecture Committee, 2017-2018

Jeremy Green, Chair

Past Garrison Lectures

  • 2017 Naomi Rogers, “Radical Visions of American Medicine: Politics and Activism in the History of Medicine”
  • 2016 Susan E. Lederer, “Bombshells and Bioethics: Henry K. Beecher’s ‘Ethics and Clinical Research’ at 50”
  • 2015 David Rosner, “Trying Times: Reflections on History, the Courts and Defining Disease”
  • 2014 Barron Lerner, “Great Doctor History, A Personal Journey”
  • 2013 Randall M. Packard, “Break-bone Fever in Philadelphia, 1780: Reflections on the History of Disease” BHM
  • 2012 Susan M. Reverby, “Enemy of the People, Enemy of the State: Two Great(ly Infamous) Doctors in the Court of History” BHM 88 (2014): 403-430.
  • 2011 Martin Pernick, “Disease and the Racial Division of Labor in America”
  • 2010 Keith Wailoo, “The Politics of Pain: Liberal Medicine, Conservative Care and the Governance of Relief in America Since the 1950s”
  • 2009 Katharine Park, “Birth, Death, and the Limits of Life: Caesarean Section in Medieval and Renaissance Europe”
  • 2008 John Harley Warner, “The Aesthetic Grounding of Modern Medicine,” BHM 88 (2014): 1-47.
  • 2007 Steven J. Peitzman, “I Am Their Physician: Dr. Owen J. Wister of Germantown and His Too Many Patients,” BHM 83 (2009): 245-270.
  • 2006 Allan M. Brandt, “Globalization, Health and History”
  • 2005 John M. Eyler, “De Kruif’s Boast: Vaccine Development and the Construction of a Virus,” BHM 80 (2006): 409-438.
  • 2004 Nancy J. Tomes, “The Great American Medicine Show Revisited,” BHM 79 (2005): 627-663.
  • 2003 Nancy Siraisi, “Medicine and the Renaissance World of Learning,” BHM 77 (2004): 1-36.
  • 2002 David J. Rothman, “Serving Clio and Client: The Historian as Expert Witness,” BHM 77 (2003): 25-44.
  • 2001 Martin Pernick — declined
  • 2000 Ludmilla Jordanova, “World Portraiture and Medical Identity”
  • 1999 Henrich von Staden, “Reading and Therapy: Literacy and Medicine in the Ancient World.”
  • 1998 Vanessa Northington Gamble, “Taking a History: The Life of Dr. Virginia Alexander”
  • 1997 Ronald L. Numbers, “Faith, Hope, and Charity: the Religious Roots of American Health Care”
  • 1996 Michael R. McVaugh, “Bedside Manners in the Middle Ages,” BHM 71 (1997):201-223.
  • 1995 John C. Burnham, “How the Concept of the Profession Evolved in the Work of Historians of Medicine,” BHM 70 (1996):1-24.
  • 1994 Judith Walzer Leavitt, “A Worrying Profession: The Domestic Environment of Medical Practice in Mid-Nineteenth Century America,” BHM 69 (1995): 1-29.
  • 1993 Rosemary Stevens, “A Dangerous Occupation? The Historian as Reformer and Policy Maker.”
  • 1992 Roy Porter, “Disease Framed–Disease Fantisized? The Case of Gout,” BHM 68 (1994):1-28.
  • 1991 Geoffrey E.R. Lloyd, “The Transformation of Ancient Medicine,” BHM 66 (1992):114-132.
  • 1990 Saul Benison, “Walter B. Cannon and the Politics of Medical Science,” BHM 65 (1991): 234-251.
  • 1989 Gert H. Brieger, “Classics and Character: Medicine and the Decline of Gentility,”  BHM 65 (1991): 88-109.
  • 1988 Vern L. Bullough, “The Physician and Sex Research,” BHM 63 (1989): 247-267.
  • 1987 Barbara G. Rosenkrantz, “On the Spot: A History of Focal Infections.”
  • 1986 Gerald N. Grob, “Psychiatry and Social Activism: The Politics of a Specialty in Post War America,” BHM 60 (1986): 477-501.
  • 1985 Frederick L. Holmes, “Patterns of Scientific Creativity,” BHM 60 (1986): 19-35.
  • 1984 Arthur E. Imhof, “From the Old Mortality Pattern to the New: Implications of a Radical Change from the Sixteenth to the Twentieth Century,” BHM (1985): 19-35.
  • 1983 John Duffy, “American Perceptions of the Medical, Legal and Theological Professions,” BHM (1984): 1-15.
  • 1982 Charles E. Rosenberg, “Medical Text and Social Context: Explaining William Buchan’s Domestic Medicine,” BHM 57 (1983): 22-42.
  • 1981 Abraham M. Lilienfeld, “Ceteris paribus: The Evolution of the Clinical Trial,” BHM 56 (1982): 1-18.
  • 1980 John Z. Bowers, “The Odyssey of Smallpox Vaccination,” BHM 55 (1982):17-33.
  • 1979 James Harvey Young, “’This Greasy Counterfeit’: Butter versus Oleomargarine in the United States Congress, 1886,” BHM 53(1977): 392-414.
  • 1978 James H. Cassedy, “An American Clerical Crisis: Minister’s Sore Throat 1830-1860,” BHM 53 (1979): 23-38.
  • 1977 Jane M. Oppenheimer, “Taking Things Apart and Putting Them Together Again,” BHM 52 (1978):149-161.
  • 1976 William B. Bean, “Walter Reed and the Ordeal of Human Experiments,” BHM 51 (1977): 75-92.
  • 1975 Lester S. King, “Evidence and its Evaluation in Eighteen Century Medicine,” BHM 50 (1976): 174-190.
  • 1974 Ilza Veith, “Blinders of the Mind: Historical Reflections on Functional Impairment of Vision,” BHM 48 (1974): 503-516.
  • 1973 Genevieve Miller, “In Praise of Amateurs: Medical Historiography in America before Garrison,“ BHM 47 (1973): 586-615.
  • 1972 Franz Rosenthal, “The Position of the Physician in Muslim Society.”
  • 1971 William R. LeFanu, “The Lost Half Century in English Medicine, 1700-1750,” BHM 46 (1972): 319-348.
  • 1970 Richard H. Shryock, “The Medical Reputation of Benjamin Rush: Contrasts over Two Centuries,” BHM 45 (1971): 507-552.
  • 1969 Whitfield J. Bell, Jr., “A Portrait of the Colonial Physician,” BHM (1970): 497-517.
  • 1968 Lloyd G. Stevenson, “A Reconsideration of the Institutes of Medicine.”
  • 1967 C. Donald O’Malley, “Helkiah Crooke, M.D., F.R.C.P., 1576-1648,” BHM (1968):1-18.
  • 1966 J. B. de C. M. Saunders, “Geography and Geopolitics in California’s Medicine of the 19th Century,” BHM (1967): 293-324.
  • 1965 William S. Middleton, “Turner’s Lane Hospital,” BHM 40 (1966): 14-42.
  • 1964 John B. Blake, “Women and Medicine in Ante-Bellum America” BHM 39 (1965): 39-99.
  • 1963 Saul Jarcho, “Some Observations on Disease in Prehistoric North American,” BHM 38 (1964): 1-19.
  • 1962 Owsei Tempkin, “Basic Science, Medicine, and the Romantic Era,” BHM (1963): 97-129.
  • 1961 George Rosen, “Psychopathology in the Social Process: Dance Frenzies, Demonic Possession, Revival Movements and Similar So-Called Psychic Epidemics, An Interpretation,” BHM (1962): 13-44.
  • 1960 Ludwig Edelstein, “The Distinctive Hellenism of Greek Medicine,” BHM 40 (1966): 197-225.
  • 1959 Walton B. McDaniel, II, “A View of Nineteenth Century Medical Historiography in the United States of America,” BHM 33 (1959): 415-435.
  • 1958 Claude E. Heaton, “Three Hundred Years of Medicine in New York City,” BHM (1958): 517-530.
  • 1957 Paul Klemperer, “The Pathology of Morgagni and Virchow,” BHM 32 (1958): 24-28.
  • 1956 F. N. L. Poynter, “Medicine and the Historian,” BHM 30 (1956): 420-435.
  • 1955 Samuel Noah Kramer, “The First Prescription in Man’s Recorded History: A Sumerian Clay Tablet from 200 D.C.” Abstract in BHM 30 (1956): 41-42.
  • 1954 Esmond S. Long, “The Decline of Chronic Infectious Disease and Its Social Implications,” BHM 28 (1954): 368-384.
  • 1953 Dorothy M. Schullian, “An Introduction to the History of Medicine, 1498,” BHM 27 (1953): 403-413.
  • 1952 Benjamin Spector, “The Growth of Medicine and the Letter of the Law,” BHM 26 (1952): 499-525.
  • 1951 Isreal E. Drabkin, “Soranus and His System of Medicine,” BHM 25 (1951): 503-518
  • 1950 Roland H. Bainton, “Michael Servetus and the Pulmonary Transit of the Blood,” BHM 25 (1951): 1-7.
  • 1949 Henry R. Viets, “George Cheyne, 1673-1743,” BHM 23 (1949): 435-452.
  • 1948 Erwin H. Ackerknecht, “Anticontagionism between 1821 and 1867,” BHM 22 (1948): 562-593.
  • 1947 E. Ashworth Underwood, “Apollo and Terpsichore: Music and the Healing Art,” BHM 21 (1947): 639-673.
  • 1946 John F. Fulton, “Science in American Universities, 1636-1946, with Particular Reference to Harvard and Yale,” BHM 20 (1946): 97-111.
  • 1945 No Lecturer
  • 1944 No Lecturer
  • 1943 William S. Middleton had been invited, but no annual meeting was held due to World War II.
  • 1942 Francis R. Packard, “Medical Case Histories in a Colonial Hospital,” BHM 21 (1947): 639-673.
  • 1941 George Sarton, “The History of Medicine versus the History of Art,” BHM 10 (1941):123-135.
  • 1940 Arturo Castiglioni, “Aulus Cornelius Celsus as a Historian of Medicine,” BHM 8 (1940): 857-873.