Lectures: Psychiatry’s Most Misunderstood Founding Father: Adolf Meyer

Psychiatry’s Most Misunderstood Founding Father: Adolf Meyer
New York Academy of Medicine and Heberden Society of Weill Cornell Medical School

Speaker: Dr. Susan Lamb, Jason A. Hannah Chair in History of Medicine at the University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine

The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029

Tuesday October 10, 2017, 6:00-7:30 p.m.

Cost: Free, but advanced registration is required. Please visit the following link to register:
https://nyam.org/events/event/psychiatrys-most-misunderstood-founding-father-adolf-meyer/

Adolf Meyer (1866-1950) exercised unparalleled influence over the development of American psychiatry during the twentieth century—intellectually, professionally, and publicly. The biological concepts and clinical methods he implemented and taught at his prominent Phipps Psychiatric Clinic at Johns Hopkins between 1910 and 1941 remain significant to psychiatric practice and neuroscientific research, and to public perceptions of mental health and illness today. Meyer’s person-centered theories spark heated controversy within American psychiatry today; are psychiatric disorders to be considered disease or non-normative character traits? Join Professor Susan Lamb, author of Pathologist of the Mind: Adolf Meyer and the Origins of American Psychiatry (Johns Hopkins, 2014), to rediscover psychiatry’s most misunderstood founding father.

Lectures: Nursing with a Message: Public Health Demonstrations in New York City

Nursing with a Message: Public Health Demonstrations in New York City

Thursday, September 14 2017

6PM-7:30PM

The New York Academy of Medicine, 1216 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street, New York, NY 10029

Free, advance registration required

Mandated by the Affordable Care Act, public health demonstration projects have been touted as an innovative solution to the nation’s health care crisis. Yet such projects actually have a long but little known history, dating back to the 1920s. Dr. Patricia D’Antonio’s newest book, Nursing with a Message: Public Health Demonstrations in New York City, reveals the key role that these local health programs – and the nurses that ran them – held in influencing how Americans perceived their personal health choices. Assessing both the successes and the failures of these nurse-run health demonstration projects, D’Antonio traces their legacy in shaping the best and the worst elements of today’s primary care system.

About the Speaker

Patricia D’Antonio, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the Carol E. Ware Professor in Psychiatric Nursing and the Director of the Barbara Bates Center for the Study of the History of Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of nursing. She is a Fellow of both the American Academy of Nursing and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. Dr. D’Antonio is also the editor of the Nursing History Review, the official journal of the American Association for the History of Nursing. She is also the author of American Nursing: A History of Knowledge, Authority and the Meaning of Work.

Lectures: 14th Annual Weisse Lecture on the History of Medicine

Nobel laureate William C. Campbell will deliver the 14th Annual Weisse Lecture on the History of Medicine at 12 Noon, Tuesday September 19, 2017.  The title of his talk will be “Finding medication: Ivermectin and beyond.”  The lecture will be held at Rutgers- New Jersey Medical School, Medical Sciences Building room B-610 at 185 South Orange Avenue, Newark, NJ 07103.  Attendees are invited to lunch in the Rosemary Gelline Room following the presentation.