Calls for Papers: Graduate Student Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine

CALL FOR PAPERS

3rd ​ ​IU Graduate Student Conference on the History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine

29th and 30th March, 2019

Indiana University Bloomington

Dept. of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine

Submission Deadline: January 1st, 2019

The Indiana University Department of History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine and HPS Graduate Students Association are calling for submissions from graduate students working on topics relating to the history and/or philosophy of science for its third graduate student conference in the spring of 2019. Submissions are welcome on a breadth of historical or philosophical topics in the sciences. This conference is intended to be an opportunity for graduate students to share their work, make connections, and receive feedback from peers and faculty in a congenial environment. The anticipated schedule is for 30 ­minute student presentations, followed by a 10­ minute response by a student commentator, and 15­-20 minutes for follow­-up questions and discussion. There will also be a poster session reception intended to facilitate discussion, particularly suited to works in their early stages of progress, ideas on new methodologies or tools in HPS, or novel ways of extending HPS into the public sphere.

Submissions:​ Please submit papers or extended outlines suitable for a 30 minute talk, or an abstract or description (~250 words) of a topic for a poster. Dual submissions for talks and posters (on related or unrelated topics) are allowed. E­mail submissions to iuhpsconf@gmail.com on or before January 1st. Acceptances will be sent out in early February.

All graduate students are welcome to attend. If you are planning to attend and would be interested in commenting, please email us with areas of interest by January 1st, and, depending on availability, we will send you an appropriate paper to comment on as soon as acceptances are issued.

Conference Time & Place: ​March- 29-30 (half-­day Friday and full-­day Saturday), 2019, on the Indiana University campus in Bloomington.

Speaker: ​We are pleased to have Kristen K. Intemann from Montana State University as our keynote speaker and featured faculty guest for the conference. Dr. Intemann’s research and teaching interests focus on feminist theory, values and science, and research ethics, particularly in relation to science and philosophy of science.  Also, she has published on issues related to objectivity, bias, and diversity in science. Visit the following website for additional information: http://www.montana.edu/history/people/kristen_intemann.html

Lodging and Logistics: ​Funding is not available to cover travel expenses, but we will facilitate lodging for student presenters with graduate student hosts here in town on a first-­come, first-­served basis. Hotels in Bloomington are also quite reasonably priced, and we’ll be glad to provide recommendations for those who wish to make their own arrangements. For questions or further details, please contact us at iuhpsconf@gmail.com or see our website at http://iuhpsgraduateconference.blogspot.com.

Contact Info:

Ryan O’Loughlin (email me at rjolough@iu.edu). Alternatively, contact us (the History and Philosophy of Science & Medince graduate students at Indiana University) at iuhpsconf@gmail.com  or see our website at http://iuhpsgraduateconference.blogspot.com

Calls for Papers: Society for the Social History of Medicine Postgraduate Conference 2019

Bodies and Minds, Sickness and Soundness
June 13-14, 2019
University of Bristol

The 2019 SSHM PG conference committee welcomes papers on any topic within the discipline of the social history of medicine and particularly encourage proposals for papers and panels that critically examine or challenge some aspect of the history of medicine and health. We welcome a range of methodological approaches, geographical regions, and time periods.

Proposals should be based on new research from postgraduate students currently registered in a University programme. Paper submissions should include a 250-word abstract, including five key words and a short bio. Panel submissions should feature three papers, a chair, and a 100-word panel abstract.

For postgraduate students not currently funded through an existing fellowship or grant, funding is available through the SSHM to help offset the costs associated with travel and accommodation. Upon acceptance of a paper, requests for bursaries should be submitted to the Executive Secretariat prior to the conference. More information can be found on our website.

All postgraduate delegates must register (or already be registered) as members of the Society for the Social History of Medicine. For more information about SSHM student membership, please see the journal subscription site.

In addition to showcasing the latest postgraduate research, the conference will feature training workshops led by members of the SSHM Executive Committee.

To propose a paper or a panel, please visit our conference website at: https://sshmpgconference2019.blogs.bristol.ac.uk/

Call for papers closes on 31 January 2019.

Please direct queries about this event to the SSHM PG Conference admin team at: sshm-pg-conference@bristol.ac.uk

Calls for Papers: 44th International Congress for the History of Pharmacy

44th International Congress for the History of Pharmacy
“The Pharmacist and Quality Medicines”
5-8 September 2019, Washington, DC

The Program Committee for the 44th International Congress for the History of Pharmacy is soliciting proposals for oral presentations and poster presentations for the Congress to be held 5-8 September 2019 in Washington, DC.

The Congress theme will be “The Pharmacist and Quality Medicines” and will address two interrelated topics: the history of the work of the pharmacist (i.e., pharmacy practice) and the profession’s effort to provide medicines of good quality. Attendees are invited to submit presentation proposals that touch on these topics, including the training, literature, and regulation of pharmacists or the social, scientific, technologic, or economic aspects of pharmaceuticals and the pharmaceutical industry. The Congress encourages abstracts concerning the history of pharmacy or medicines from all geographical locations and from any historical era.

Deadlines:
Abstracts must be submitted online using the online form available at the call for abstracts on the Congress website. Please provide all requested information. Abstracts may not exceed 500 words. The deadline for oral presentation submissions is 1 April 2019 and the deadline for poster presentation submissions is 1 May 2019.

Submitters will be informed of whether their submissions have been accepted by 1 June 2019 for oral presentations and by 1 July 2019 for poster presentations. Although potential presenters may submit more than one proposal for oral and poster presentations, no more than one oral and one poster presentation per individual will be accepted for the program.

All poster and podium presenters must register for the Congress.

Requirements:
Oral presentations will be strictly limited to 15 minutes, including discussion. Posters shall be no larger than 48 inches (122 cm) in width and 72 inches (183 cm) in height.

Congress Information:
The host hotel for the 44th International Congress for the History of Pharmacy will be the Capital Hilton in downtown Washington, DC.

Plenary speakers will include:
•       Jacalyn Duffin, former president of the American Association for the History of Medicine and the author of eight books, including Medical Saints: Cosmas and Damian in a Postmodern World and Medical Miracles: Doctors, Saints, and Healing in the Modern World.
•      Michael A. Flannery, professor emeritus of UAB Libraries (University of Alabama at Birmingham) and the author of several books, including Civil War Pharmacy: A History and John Uri Lloyd: The Great American Eclectic.
•      Lucas Richert, a Chancellor’s Fellow in History at the University of Strathclyde (Glasgow, Scotland) and the incoming George Urdang Chair in the History of Pharmacy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy, and the author of Conservatism, Consumer Choice, and the Food and Drug Administration during the Reagan Era: A Prescription for Scandal.

For additional information, please see the Congress website: http://44ichp.org.

The 44th International Congress for the History of Pharmacy is co-sponsored by the American Institute for the History of Pharmacy and the International Society for the History of Pharmacy. It is supported by a generous grant from the United States Pharmacopeial Convention.

Contact Information:
American Institute of the History of Pharmacy
777 Highland Avenue
Madison, WI 53705
(608) 262-5378
aihp@aihp.org

Calls for Papers: Entanglements in the Early Modern Mediterranean, Seventh Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies,

Entanglements in the Early Modern Mediterranean

At the Seventh Annual Symposium on Medieval and Renaissance Studies,

Saint Louis University, St. Louis, MO, USA, 17-19 June 2019

Our present society is tightly connected: people, goods, information, and technology traverse the global community at remarkable speed, creating a complex web of relationships, or “entanglements,” that cross political, social, cultural, and economic boundaries. Such intricacies also existed in the early modern Mediterranean, particularly with the augmented personal contact and increased exchange of knowledge, culture, and commodities, set against conflict between rising states and hardened religious boundaries. Over the last few decades, historians have increasingly focused upon these entanglements, highlighting the complexity of life, both “in and of” the Mediterranean.

We are organizing panels that accentuate complexities or “entanglements” in the early modern Mediterranean. We are especially interested in paper and panel proposals that focus on science/medicine, economy, and religion, not only the historical entanglements but also the interaction of these topics methodologically. Additional ideas are welcome for consideration.

Please send title (15-word maximum), abstract (150-word maximum), three keywords, and one-page CV to the panel organizers, Beth Petitjean (beth.petitjean@slu.edu) and Dru Swadener (dru.swadener@slu.edu)  by December 15, 2018.

For more information on the SMRS, please visit http://smrs-slu.org.

Calls for Papers: Medical Narratives of Ill Health

CALL FOR PAPERS

Humanities special issue: “Medical Narratives of Ill Health”

The field of literature and medicine has been steadily growing over the past four decades, solidifying itself as a vital component of the medical and health humanities. The intersection of literature and medicine enriches how we view issues of health, disease, and care, particularly in how we value the individual’s narrative of health and ill health to help with diagnosis, treatment, and the relationship between the practitioner and the patient. In an attempt to wade through the difficult terrain of defining disease and health, Kenneth Boyd provides the following medical definitions (adapted from Marshall Marinker’s earlier work): “Disease […] is the pathological process, deviation from a biological norm. Illness is the patient’s experience of ill health, sometimes when no disease can be found. Sickness is the role negotiated with society” (Boyd, 1997). What Boyd reveals about these definitions is that one allows for the individual’s experience of ill health (illness), while the other two rely on others’ perceptions of ill health. Thus, he concludes, a clear definition of disease (and even sickness) is elusive: “to call something a disease is a value judgement, relatively unproblematic in cases when it is widely shared, but more contentious when people disagree about it” (Boyd, 1997). This contentious space has widened during the modern medical era (early nineteenth century to the present day), as medical reliance on technology favors an objective identification of disease. However, literary works, through both personal accounts and fictional scenarios, challenge this singular narrative of disease and ill health provided by the medical community.

For this special issue of Humanities, we seek to explore how literature from the early nineteenth century to the present day engages with and challenges modern medical authority when it comes to understanding disease, illness, and sickness. Papers for this special issue of Humanities should focus on narratives—fictional and/or non-fictional (such as medical realism, science fiction, pathographies, medical reports, etc.)—that explore the contentious space of disagreement between medicine, society, and the individual. Authors might consider topics such as: disease as metaphor; social vs. medical definitions of disease; patient agency and individual experiences of illness; challenges to medical technology’s presumed objectivity; representations of contagion and/or public health—or any other topics that relate to better understanding literary representations of disease, illness, and/or sickness.

Articles should be no more than 8000 words, inclusive of notes. The deadline for submission of articles to the guest editor is January 10, 2019: please email articles directly to Amanda M. Caleb at acaleb@misericordia.edu. The deadline for final drafts is February 28, 2019, with expected puplication in early Summer 2019. Please consult the journal’s webpage for formatting instructions: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/humanities/special_issues/contagion. 

Dr. Amanda Caleb
Guest Editor

Contact Info: Dr. Amanda M. Caleb, Misericordia University
Contact Email: acaleb@misericordia.edu