Calls for Papers: Cultural Histories of Air and Illness Conference

Call for Papers
Cultural Histories of Air and Illness Conference

University of Warwick
8–9 June 2018

Keynote Speakers:
Jennifer Tucker (Wesleyan University)
Richard Hamblyn (Birkbeck, University of London)

Air has always had an influence on the health of individuals, societies, cities, and nations. From Hippocrates’s belief that air affected the human body to Victorian medical theories on tropical climates and bad air as the source of disease, air was understood to have a direct effect on health and to be a cause of illness. With the advent of modern medicine, the role of air’s impact on human health has shifted, but remains present. For instance, current concerns about air pollution and respiratory disease, as well as the role climate change is playing on the health of ecosystems and nations, demonstrate the continued significance of air’s relationship to health.

The Cultural Histories of Air and Illness Conference will span disciplines and periods to explore broadly the link between human health and the air. How have we thought about, studied, and depicted the connections between air and illness? In what ways have we represented air as a source or carrier of visible and invisible dangers? How have humans constructed their relationship with the environment and what role has the environment played in the history of human health? How has air pollution and climate change impacted health across a globalized world?

Topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • Medical theories about air and the body across history
  • Representations of the relationship between air and health in literature, art, visual culture, film, theatre, and the media
  • Cultural constructions of healthy and unhealthy environments
  • Air as a vector of disease
  • Medical topography, meteorology, and climatology
  • Air pollution and industrialization
  • Urban planning, gardens, and green lungs
  • Radiation and the threat of the invisible
  • Climate change and global health

The conference welcomes proposals of 250 words for twenty-minute papers suitable for an interdisciplinary audience. The deadline for proposals is 15 January 2018. Please use the conference organizer’s email address for all correspondence and proposals: a.sciampacone@warwick.ac.uk

For further information, please visit the conference website at: https://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/arthistory/research/conferences/air/

Conference Organizer: Dr Amanda Sciampacone

This conference is generously supported by the Leverhulme Trust and the University of Warwick’s Humanities Research Centre.

Calls for Papers: Joint Meeting of the Asian Society of the History of Medicine and History of Medicine in Southeast Asia

CALL FOR PAPERS
Joint meeting of The Asian Society of the History of Medicine (9th meeting) and HOMSEA (History of Medicine in Southeast Asia)
to be held in Jakarta, Indonesia, June 27-30, 2018

Theme: Colonial Medicine after Decolonisation: Continuity, Transition, and Change

Guidelines for Submission: Submissions on all topics related to the history of medicine in Asia are welcome; submissions related to the conference theme are especially encouraged.
Participants can submit full panels (2, 3, or 4 papers) as well as individual papers. Paper proposals (title, author, and an abstract in English of no more than 200 words) and a1-page
curriculum vitae or panel proposals (a panel proposing of no more than 200 words with abstracts and 1-page CVs of all participants) should be sent by electronic mail to Dr. James
Dunk (james.dunk@sydney.edu.au). The program committee reserves the right to suggest changes and revisions to abstracts and panel proposals.

Deadline for submission: 1 February 2018
Notification of acceptance will be given by 1 March 2018.

Program committee: Dr. Harry Yi-Jui Wu (Hong Kong); Dr. Ning Jennifer Chang (Taipei); Prof Laurence Monnais (Montreal); A/Prof Hans Pols (Sydney); Dr. Yu-Chuan Wu (Taipei);
Dr. Por Heong Hong (Kuala Lumpur); and members of the Local Arrangements Committee. Unfortunately, the ASHM cannot offer funds to defray travel expenses due to budget
constraints. There is a range of affordable accommodation available near the conference venue. Participants are encouraged to apply for support from their home departments or
institutions.

The conference will be hosted by the Indonesian Academy of Sciences, which is located in the new buildings of the Indonesian National Library in the centre of Jakarta.

Calls for Papers: Histories of Disability: local, global and colonial stories

Histories of Disability: local, global and colonial stories

7-8 June 2018, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Back in 2001, the historian of American deafness Douglas Baynton argued that ‘Disability is everywhere in history, once you begin looking for it, but conspicuously absent in the histories we write’ (Baynton, 2001, p. 52). Since then the history of disability has burgeoned with many important studies showing this not only to be a significant field but a vibrant one. But several key areas remain to be thoroughly interrogated. The historiography remains largely limited to America and western Europe, historians have been slow to take up the exciting postcolonial questions explored by literary scholars and sociologists about the relationship between colonialism and disability, and a tendency has remained to treat the western experience of disability as a universal one. This workshop aims to interrogate these biases, shed light on geographical specificity of disability and think more about the global history of disability both empirically and theoretically.

Questions of interest might include, but are not limited to

·         How is the experience and construction of disability specific to time and place?
·         What is the relationship between the local and the global when considering the history of disability?
·         How does disability intersect with other identities (such as race, gender, class and religion)?
·         What is the relationship between disability and imperialism/colonialism?
·         How can postcolonial theory help us better historicise the experience of disability?
·         Does the concept of ‘disability’ itself work outside a western context?
·         How are the histories of disability shaped by mobility, movement and travel?

Abstracts of c. 300 words should be sent to Esme Cleall, e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk by 1st December 2017. I’d also be happy to answer any questions.

Contact Info:

Esme Cleall, University of Sheffield, e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk

Calls for Papers: Abortion in the British Isles, France and North America since 1800

International Conference organised by the University of Paris-Sorbonne (France), 6-8 November 2018.

Conveners: Claire Charlot, Adrien Lherm (Paris-Sorbonne, HDEA EA 4086), and Fabienne Portier-Le Cocq (University François Rabelais, Tours, ICD EA 6297).

Around the world, 2018 will mark the anniversary of a series of events relating to the decriminalisation of abortion: the enforcement of the UK Abortion Act 1967 (50 years), the US Supreme Court ruling of Roe vs. Wade (45 years), and the Canada Supreme Court ruling of R. v. Morgentaler (25 years). The Republic of Ireland is also planning a referendum on the possible repeal of Article 8 of its Constitution which, if approved, would lead to the decriminalisation of abortion there too. In addition, shortly after the British General Election of 2017, Prime Minister, Theresa May, announced that women from Northern Ireland (currently excluded from the British Abortion Act) would be allowed to travel to mainland Britain to secure an abortion on the National Health Service.

Over the years, some countries have authorised abortion on therapeutic grounds (when the physical and mental health of the mother or health of the foetus is at risk), and sometimes extended terminations to other grounds such as birth control or the right of women to take control over their bodies. In this instance, the context provided by the 1960s and the 1970s would prove decisive in the liberalisation of legislation; a move described by some as ‘permissive’ and by others as ‘progressive’. A reform of the laws on contraception often pre-dated the legalisation of abortion, helping to shape a context in which women sought greater freedom from child-bearing.

However, despite changes in attitudes and legal frameworks, the abortion debate goes on and many attempts have been and are still being made to turn the clock back. This can take various forms: street protests, physical violence (including assault and shootings), legal challenges, and demands for amendment or repeal of existing legislation from anti-abortion lobbies and political movements or parties created for the sole purpose of going back to a world without legally-available abortion.

The aim of this conference will be to consider all these developments in France and in the UK, Ireland, Canada and the United States, and to seek to explain how debate, the Law, as well as the situation on the ground, have changed over the last two centuries in the different countries concerned. Among the possible topics of interest for the conference are: a) quantifying abortions and relating the phenomenon to that of statistical knowledge; b) charting the evolution of the legislation or rulings which led to the criminalisation and then the decriminalisation of abortion; c) examining the social status of women affected by those changes in the countries concerned; d) describing and explaining changes in attitudes among the various actors involved: public opinion, the medical profession, politicians, members of the different churches, journalists, the activists of the different movements or political parties and of course women themselves; e) exploring the sociological profiles of women who seek abortions.

Such topics raise a number of key questions. Is abortion used today as a method of birth control? Can we speak of abortion on demand? Can we speak of a backlash against abortion? Such questions, it is hoped, will contribute to an interdisciplinary discussion among conference participants concerning the issues raised by abortion.

Proposals for papers on one of these topics – or others – are invited either in French or English, and may address only one aspect of the abortion question at a national level, or adopt a comparative approach. We hope to attract specialists from a wide variety of fields: bioethics, demography, law, religious studies, economics, history, medical studies, philosophy, sociology, political science, and so on.

Please send a proposal (a 500-word abstract and a short CV) to each of the three organisers: Claire Charlot (clairecharlot.sorbonne@gmail.com), Adrien Lherm (adrienlherm@wanadoo.fr) and Fabienne Portier-Le Cocq (fabienne.portier-lecocq@univ-tours.fr). The deadline is 23rd December 2017. Those submitting a proposal will be informed before the New Year whether their paper has been accepted. Some papers will be published. A registration fee will be asked of participants.

Scientific committee: Nathalie Bajos (INSERM, France), Françoise Barret-Ducrocq (Paris-Diderot, France), Claire Charlot (Paris-Sorbonne, France), Ann Furedi (Bpas, United Kingdom), Hélène Harter (Rennes 2, France), Françoise Le Jeune (Nantes, France), Adrien Lherm (Paris-Sorbonne, France), Janine Mossuz-Lavau (CNRS, CEVIPOF), Fabienne Portier-Le Cocq (Tours, France), Joshua C. Wilson (Denver, USA).

Calls for Papers: New Historical Perspectives on Ageing and the Life Course

New Historical Perspectives on Ageing and the Life Course
19-20 March 2018
Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds, UK

In recent decades, global research activity around ageing and the life course has grown exponentially. Work in the clinical sciences, and in the established field of gerontology, has explored the challenges and opportunities of ageing through investigations focusing on biological and biosocial elements. More recently, scholars in the humanities and the social sciences working in the field of ageing studies have been turning their attentions to the topic, offering interdisciplinary cultural and social analyses that are theoretically, politically, and empirically engaged. Within this category, a number of scholars across academic disciplines including history of medicine, philosophy, film studies, literature, law, sociology, psychology, and anthropology – and in the cross-disciplinary field of medical humanities – are united by a shared interest in historical perspectives on youth, ageing, and old age.

This two-day conference will bring together scholars whose work engages with the past, to share new perspectives on the role and value of historical approaches to ageing across disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences. Several key questions will frame the event:

  • What can historical research on ageing and the life-course in the humanities and social sciences offer that is distinctive from modes of enquiry in these areas in the clinical sciences?
  • To consider ageing in historical contexts is to encounter issues of disciplinary boundaries and hierarchies, dominant histories, and canonicity. What is the specific nature of these challenges, and how might they be navigated?
  • Is it enough to reconstruct historical, socio-cultural contexts of ageing? Or should historical projects also develop innovative approaches that will address present-day issues?
  • How might scholars in the humanities and social sciences whose work includes historical approaches work together across disciplinary boundaries?
  • Who are the audiences for historical research in ageing? How might we communicate effectively with the academic sciences, with non-academic audiences, and with policy-makers, and public-health organisations?
  • What are the broader implications of this kind of work for developing further knowledge and understanding of the role of historical approaches to the study of human health, disability, disease, minds and bodies?

We invite contributions in the form of 20-minute papers from scholars at any career stage, and from any discipline in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, broadly construed. Proposals from doctoral and early-career researchers are particularly welcomed. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of 250-300 words, together with a brief biographical note of no more than 150 words to Dr Catherine Oakley (C.M.C.Oakley@leeds.ac.uk), by 30 November 2017.

Papers might engage with the questions outlined above from a particular disciplinary perspective. Further topics could include, but are not restricted to:

  • Senescence and old age
  • Rejuvenation and anti-ageing
  • Childhood, adolescence, and youth
  • Ageing and scientific technologies
  • Families and intergenerational relationships
  • Age and demographic change
  • Ageing in visual and material cultures
  • Ageing, gender, sex and sexuality
  • Work, retirement, and pensions
  • Ethics of ageing
  • Age, ageing, and youthfulness in popular culture
  • Global perspectives on age and ageing

Confirmed keynote speakers include Dr Hyung Wook Park (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) whose recent book Old Age, New Science posits a close relationship between the emergence of gerontology and changing social perspectives of ageing in the first half of the twentieth century.

The conference is being organised as part of the Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded project “Endless Possibilities of Rejuvenation: Defying Ageing, Defining Youth in Britain, 1919-1948”, led by Dr James Stark at the University of Leeds.

Calls for Papers: Canadian Soceity for the History and Philosophy of Science (CSHPS)

Call for Abstracts 

CSHPS Annual Conference

Regina, May 26-28, 2018
Proposals due January 12th, 2018  

The Canadian Society for the History and Philosophy of Science (CSHPS) is holding its annual conference as part of the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Regina, Saskatchewan, May 26-28, 2018 (http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/meeting.html).

The Program Committee invites scholars working on the history and philosophy of science to submit abstracts for individual papers or proposals for sessions (3 and 4 papers). We particularly encourage scholars to engage with the theme for Congress 2018 – “Gathering diversities”. Unrelated topics and themes are also welcome.

  • Meeting languages: The CSHPS is a bilingual society. Individual papers may be given in English or French, but efforts to broaden participation are appreciated (e.g. a presentation in English could be accompanied by a PowerPoint in French, and vice versa). Similarly, sessions can be presented in either English or French, but bilingual sessions are especially welcomed.
  • Joint sessions: The CSHPS meeting overlaps with the meeting dates of a number of other member societies of the CFHSS, including the Canadian Historical Association, Women’s and Gender Studies et Recherches Féministes, and Canadian Society for the History of Medicine. We welcome proposals for joint sessions with these and other societies (please mention this specifically in your session proposal). However, no talk will be accepted for presentation at more than one society.
  • Number of submissions: Individuals can only submit one abstract for the CSHPS meeting (i.e. either an abstract for an individual paper or an abstract part of a session proposal).
  • Submissions
    • In order to preserve the anonymity of authors, it is important that contact information and other identifying information be excluded from the file containing the abstract.
    • Individual paper submissions should consist of a title, a brief abstract (150-250 words), a list of keywords, and—in the accompanying email—the author’s name and contact information.
    • Session proposals should consist of a session title, titles and brief abstracts (150-250 words) for each paper, a list of keywords, and—in the accompanying email—the names and contact information of the presenters and session organizer.
    • Proposals should be in MS Word, pdf, odt or rtf format.
    • Deadline: January 12th, 2018
    • Submission email address: cshps@gmail.com
  • Presenters: All presenters must be members of the CSHPS at the time of the meeting. For more information about CSHPS membership, consult: http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/join.html.
  • Student Prize: The CSHPS offers the Richard Hadden Award, a book prize for the best student paper presented at the meeting. To be considered for the award, students should submit a copy of their paper by e-mail by May 4th, 2018. Details of this prize can be found at:

http://www.yorku.ca/cshps1/HaddenPrize.html

  • CFHSS: Information about Congress registration and accommodation will be available at the CFHSS congress website: http://congress2018.ca.

Program Committee (2017-2018): François Claveau (Sherbrooke) Chair, Vivien Hamilton (Harvey Mudd College), Jennifer Hubbard (Ryerson)

Local Arrangements: Yvonne Petry (Regina)

Calls for Papers: Workshop Exploring the History of Animal-Assisted Therapy and Service Animals

Being Well Together: human-animal collaboration, companionship and the promotion of health and wellbeing (19th-21st September 2018).

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM).

University of Manchester (UK).

Being Well Together will critically examine the myriad ways humans have formed partnerships with nonhuman species to improve health across time and place. The late twentieth century witnessed the simultaneous rise and diversification of varied entanglements of humans and animals in the pursuit of health and wellbeing. Clinical examples include the use of maggots to treat chronic wounds and the post-surgical use of leeches to aid healing. In wider society we might consider service animals, such as guide dogs, diabetes alert dogs, and emotional support animals. In the home pets are increasingly recognized to contribute to emotional wellbeing, with companion animals particularly important to those who are otherwise at risk of social isolation. Expanded to include concepts such as the ‘human’ microbiome in the opening decades of the twenty-first century, these entanglements may be recognized as ‘multispecies medicine’. In each case, human health and wellbeing rests on the cultivation of relationships with other species. Being well is a process of being well together.

We invite proposals to explore multispecies communication, collaboration and companionship in contexts of medicine, health and wellbeing. Areas of interest include, but are not limited to, the lived experience of health as a product of multispecies relations, the role of affect and emotion in the maintenance of human and nonhuman wellbeing, and the societal politics of ‘being well’ when ‘being well’ is a more than human condition. The lived experience of being well with animals can reshape understandings of health, wellbeing and disability; its study may provide new approaches to productively frame the relationship between the politics of animal and disability advocacy.

Participants will be drawn from a range of disciplines with interests spanning, though not restricted to, medical and environmental humanities. We aim to strike a balance between studies adopting historical perspectives and those which critically examine areas of contemporary practice. In bringing historical accounts into dialogue with present practices, Being Well Together will generate new perspectives on medicine, health and changing relations of human and animal life in society.

Practical Details.

Titles and abstracts (400 words maximum) as well as general queries should be addressed to Rob Kirk (robert.g.kirk@manchester.ac.uk) and Neil Pemberton (neil.pemberton@manchester.ac.uk) by Thursday 30th November 2017.

Invited participants will provide a written draft paper for pre-circulation (6-8000 words maximum inclusive of references) by 31st July 2018. These ‘work-in-progress’ papers will be the starting point for discussions at the September workshop with a view to producing an edited volume.

Accommodation and travel costs for invited participants will be covered by the organisers.

Being Well Together is the first in a series of activities supported by the Wellcome Trust (UK) Investigator Award, ‘Multispecies Medicine: Biotherapy and the Ecological Vision of Health and Wellbeing’. Based at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester, this collaborative research project examines how, why and to what consequence, human and nonhuman life has become variously entangled within health, wellbeing and society.

See: http://www.chstm.manchester.ac.uk/newsandevents/conferences/beingwelltogether

Calls for Papers: Material Cultures of Psychiatry Workshop

MATERIAL CULTURES OF PSYCHIATRY Workshop, Hamburg

 Date: 3-4 May 2018, Hamburg

 Organisers: Dr Monika Ankele (Department for History and Ethics of Medicine at the University Clinic Hamburg-Eppendorf) and Prof. Benoît Majerus (Centre for Contemporary and Digital History, University of Luxembourg)

 Deadline: 15 December 2017

Languages: German, English

In the past, our ideas of psychiatric hospitals and their history have been shaped by objects like straitjackets, cribs and binding belts. These powerful objects are often used as a synonym for psychiatry and the way psychiatric patients are treated. But what do we really know about the social life (see Majerus 2011) of psychiatric patients and the stories of less spectacular objects in the everyday life of psychiatric institutions? What do we know about the material cultures of these places in general?

The workshop will use the term “material cultures” very broadly and in the plural. This term refers not only to medical objects, objects of therapy and objects of care, but also to everyday cultural objects. The latter are subject to change when they enter the realm of psychiatry, where they become part of the specific cultural praxis of psychiatric institutions: a bed clearly changes its meaning in a psychiatric hospital, but so do flowers, a mirror and a blanket. The term “material cultures” also includes phenomena that have a material dimension like air, light, colours and sound (see Kalthoff et al. 2016). The use of the term in the plural should make us aware of the different, often competing cultural practices that emerge when we focus on the application and appropriation of objects and materials by patients, doctors and nursing staff. It also raises the question of the extent to which material cultures influence both therapeutic treatment and the production of knowledge.

Objects as agents

Objects can be described as agents since they have a stabilising, destabilising and transforming impact on the practice of psychiatry; they organise social relationships, influence or predetermine the practice of psychiatry, have an impact on power relations and create specific self-relations and relationships with others. Presentations should analyse objects from the history of psychiatry as agents and explore their fields of action.

Means of appropriation and expropriation

The (artistic) works of patients, as found in historical collections such as the Prinzhorn Collection in Heidelberg and the Morgenthaler Collection in Bern, are impressive testimonies of the manifold ways that patients appropriated the different materials of psychiatric hospitals, including remnants, clippings, bedsprings and much more. They are part of a material culture of psychiatry and bear its traces. In parallel, patients’ works as well as personal belongings were subject to expropriation, interpreted as symptoms of a disease or used for the implementation of new (power) relations. Appropriation concerned not only materials but also therapeutic objects or objects of care that had to be appropriated by patients, doctors and nursing staff.

Scenography of things

The term “scenography” refers to the design of stage scenery. It draws attention to the spatial arrangement of people and things as well as the scripts that are inscribed in an object, which the spatial arrangement (of a ward, a day room, a hall) should express. It poses the question of how objects and material phenomena structured the perception, communication and movements of patients, nursing staff and doctors, and how these spatial arrangements of objects and agents influenced the interactions and power relations between them.

Transformations

How do objects of therapy and objects of care, as well as everyday cultural objects, materials and material phenomena, acquire their specific meaning for the various agents of a psychiatric institution? What transformation process do they go through? What transformations do these objects undergo in practice? Objects should also be seen as an interface, where ways of thinking and acting meet, condense, shift and materialise.

Economies

Examining the material cultures of psychiatry involves looking at questions of economy: the economy of the institution, individual economies like the exchange of materials and things, the economical use of materials, etc. In what ways do the economic conditions of the institution influence the material cultures of psychiatry and how do these cultures affect the economy of the institution?

Presentations should take into account the social and cultural background of objects of psychiatry, their various meanings, their involvement in actions, their ability to act and to shape social and spatial relations as well as their reference to practices of knowledge, specific discourses and power relations. Corresponding approaches referring to the “material turn” are the focus of much interest in the cultural and social sciences and have been the subject of research in the history of medicine, but they have been neglected in historical research on psychiatry, at least in the German-speaking realm.

Possible research objects for your presentations could be the following: beds, baths, doors, corridors, walls, bed screens, tables, chairs, bedside tables and bath tubs; tools, dishes, knives, spoons and forks; murals, bars, fences, windows; bowling alleys; keys and locks; paintings, books, plants, flowers, mirrors; light, darkness, water, electricity, smells; syringes, needles, sleeping pills and tranquilisers, straitjackets, binding belts; blankets, pillows, sheets, clothes, white coats, fabrics; straw, seaweed, horse hair, paper, packing material, cigarettes; telephones, watchs, typewriters; food, etc.

We are also interested in discussing the epistemic value of a material approach for the history of psychiatry and its possible additions to or corrections of this history. What agents, practices and social interactions come into view when we focus on the material dimensions of psychiatry? What agents and practices that previously went unnoticed gain significance by focusing on the material cultures of psychiatry? And what new perspectives on the psychiatric institution open up?

Please submit an abstract (max. 2000 characters) with a short CV tom.ankele@uke.de by 15 December 2017. Inventive approaches and presentations are especially welcome. We would also be delighted to receive proposals for artistic work.

The workshop is part of the research project “Bed and Bath: Objects and Spaces of Therapy in Psychiatry of the 19th and 20th century” (head of project: Univ. Prof. Dr Heinz-Peter Schmiedebach), funded by the German Research Foundation. We are not yet sure that travel and accommodation costs will be fully covered.

It is planned to publish the papers presented at the workshop in an edited book. The contributions (15 to 20 papers) should be submitted by 10 July 2018 to ensure a quick turnaround.

Calls for Papers: Scoeity for the Social History of Medicine (SSHM)

Society for the Social History of Medicine (SSHM)

Call for Papers

2018 Biennial Conference – University of Liverpool

11-13 July 2018

The Society welcomes proposals on the theme of ‘Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine’

Deadline for Proposals Friday 2 February 2018 sshm2018@liverpool.ac.uk

The Society for the Social History of Medicine hosts a major biennial, international, and interdisciplinary conference. In July 2018 it will meet in Liverpool to explore the theme of ‘Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine’.

This broad theme plays on several levels. It reflects our local Liverpool health heritage as a site of public health innovation; independent and at times radical approaches to health politics, health inequalities, health determinants, treatment and therapies (including technological innovation, community and collective practices, and the use of arts in health).

We envisage that this conference theme will also stimulate participants to think about how medical orthodoxy has been shaped and re-molded, and how patients and practitioners choose to conform to conventional practices, seek alternatives, resist or compromise. The theme further facilitates a transnational conference strand, examining the construction of, and attitudes towards, Western and other medical traditions and health systems. In light of this theme, the 2018 conference committee encourages papers, sessions, round-tables and other interventions that examine, challenge, and refine histories of conformity, resistance, dialogue and deviance in medicine and health. These might be set in relation to inclusions, exclusions and injustices; insiders, outsiders and mediators; peoples, places and cultures; and diverse and expanding new social histories of health and medicine.

For further details, please visit the conference webpage link: https://www.liverpool.ac.uk/history/events/sshm/

 

Calls for Papers: Journal of Military, Veteran, and Family Health

Call for Papers

The Journal of Military, Veteran and Family Health aims to maximize the mental, physical and social health and well-being of military personnel, Veterans and their families by publishing world class research to a broad international and multidisciplinary readership of researchers, clinicians, administrators, and policy makers. http://bit.ly/jmvfh_cfp

JMVFH publishes original research articles and several other types of articles related to the health and well-being of the populations of interest including: Emerging Practices and Programs, Clinical Practice Reviews, Arts and Humanities articles, Perspectives, Talking Points, and Letters.

The journal welcomes submissions in the following research theme areas:

  • Mental health and rehabilitation
  • Physical health and rehabilitation
  • Social health and well-being
  • Transition from military to civilian life
  • Family health and wellbeing
  • Evolving treatment practices or programs
  • Occupational and environmental health
  • Novel health technologies related to military service
  • Transitions back to family life after deployment
  • Health care policies and programs
  • Military history related to health and well-being
  • The arts and military health and well-being, and
  • Gender based research related to any of the above theme areas.

The journal is multidisciplinary in scope and accepts articles from researchers and clinicians conducting research relevant to enhancing the physical, mental or social health of the beneficiary populations. Some of these disciplines include Bioinformatics, Biomechanical Engineering, Kinesiology and Health Studies, Medicine, Neurosciences, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Organizational Behavior, Physical Therapy, Psychiatry, Psychology, Public Administration, Public Health, Social Work, Sociology, and the Arts and Humanities.

For more details about article types and submission requirements please consult the Guidelines for Submissions –http://bit.ly/jmvfhguide

Journal of Military, Veteran and Family Health(JMVFH)   http://bit.ly/jmvfh

The aim of this new open-access journal is to maximize the health and social well-being of military personnel, Veterans, and their families by disseminating world-class research to a broad international and multidisciplinary readership of researchers, practitioners, administrators, and policy makers.

The Journal of Military, Veteran and Family Health provides a forum for the latest research in mental and physical health and rehabilitation, social health and wellbeing, the transition from military to civilian life, family health and wellbeing, evolving treatment practices or programs, occupational and environmental health, novel health technologies related to military service, transitions back to family life after deployment, health care or health-related policies and programs, military history related to health and wellbeing, the arts and military health and well-being, and gender-based research related to any of the above. JMVFH is edited by Alice Aiken and Stéphanie Bélanger, and managed by Mike Schaub.

Contact Info: http://bit.ly/jmvfh