Calls for Papers: Marketplace, Power, Prestige: The Healthcare Professions’ Struggle for Recognition

Marketplace, Power, Prestige: The Healthcare Professions’ Struggle for Recognition Developments, Conflicts, and Areas of Tension among Healthcare Professions in the Twentieth Century

The differentiation of non-physician healthcare professions that occurred at the same time as the specialisation of medicine and the development of medical technology gained momentum at the end of the nineteenth century. At this point, the academically educated doctors had already ousted their less-qualified competitors, such as traditional surgeons (Wundärzte or Handwerkschirurgen), from the medical marketplace. This development put doctors in a position, from which they had since secured great influence in the state accreditation process of new or newly regulated healthcare professions: a status that they still possess today. According to the German Vocational Training Act (Berufsbildungsgesetz), for example, the state medical associations (Landesärztekammern) are responsible for education and training of medical professionals.

As widely known, the medical care of the population is currently facing issues in a number of areas. Therefore, it is in the interest of the state and society to allow alternatives to the care by physicians. Especially in recent years, the delegation of doctors’ tasks to other healthcare professions has been discussed. Already in 2010, the Cooperative State University (Duale Hochschule) in Karlsruhe established a bachelor degree as physician assistants (Arztassistent). Examples for this endeavour are corresponding job profiles, which partly exist in other countries since decades. In this context, the professionalization or academisation of nursing plays an increasingly important role. One current example for this development represents the model course ‘Evidence Based Nursing’ at the Medical Faculty of the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, established in 2016. The shift of competency and agency, however, led and leads into a number of problems as well. Therefore, the main focus of the conference will be the conflicts and areas of tensions, which accompanied the development or differentiation of the healthcare professions.

For example, the reasons and topics will be discussed because of which conflicts among medical professions occurred. Which parties were involved, which coalitions were established, how did the parties present themselves, and for what aims did they campaign for? Of particular concern will be the question, to what extent contributed such disputes to the shift on the suppliers’ side in the medical marketplace and what consequences had this development on the demanders’ side.

The key questions can be discussed on three levels and with retrospective considerations of the pre-modern period (monopolisation, professionalization).

1. Conflicts and Areas of Tensions Within one Healthcare Profession

On the first level of investigation, the negotiation process within one healthcare profession will be analysed. Within nursing, topics such as the conflicts between men and women, migrants and natives, or also between academic and non-academic people would be possible. Within the doctors’ profession, the main questions would be the conflicts between medical specialist and general practitioners, hospital and private doctors, or also between conventional and complementary or alternative medical practitioners.

2. Conflicts and Areas of Tensions Between Different Healthcare Professions

The second level puts the lines of conflict and tension between the different healthcare professions at the core of the investigation. Which occupational groups exercised influence on the development of adjacent occupations? For this level, it would be possible to analyse the disputes between conventional and alternative practitioners, doctors and osteopaths, psychiatrists and psychologists, gynaecologists and midwives, doctors and nurses, or doctors and psychotherapists.

3. Transnational Perspectives

The transnational perspective describes the comparison of the developments in Germany with other European countries. The question is how the different structural organisation of medical care impacted the development of healthcare professions? A comparison between centralist and federalist or capitalist and socialist systems would be of particular interest to the third level.

Presentations, Discussion, and Reimbursements

A slot of 45 minutes will be given to every presenter, in which a maximum of 20 minutes should be used for the paper and 25 minutes will be reserved for discussion. The spoken language at the conference will be English. The participation at the conference will be funded by the Institute for History of Medicine of the Robert Bosch Foundation, which includes the costs of accommodation, conference meals, and 2nd class train tickets for traveling to and from Stuttgart (only in exceptional cases, cheap flights will be reimbursed as well). Unfortunately, the costs incurred when traveling by car cannot be reimbursed.

Registration To participate at the conference, please apply with an abstract of 400 words maximum, which includes title, research question, methods, and used sources as well as possible hypothesis and results, until 30 June 2017 via post or email to Dr Pierre Pfütsch and Dr Sylvelyn Hähner-Rombach, Institut für Geschichte der Medizin der Robert Bosch Stiftung, Straußweg 17, 70184 Stuttgart, Germany, or pierre.pfuetsch@igm-bosch.de and sylvelyn.haehner@igm-bosch.de.

Jobs: Lecturer History of Science, Technology, Medicine, Environment, or Quantitative/Computational History

Lecturer – History of Science, Technology, Medicine, Environment, or Quantitative/Computational History – Department of History

Job #JPF01301

College of Letters & Science – History

RECRUITMENT PERIOD

Open date: March 10th, 2017

Next review date: March 24th, 2017

Apply by this date to ensure full consideration by the committee.

Final date: March 9th, 2018

Applications will continue to be accepted until this date, but those received after the review date will only be considered if the position has not yet been filled.

DESCRIPTION

Lecturer – History of Science, Technology, Medicine, Environment, or Quantitative/Computational History – Department of History

The Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley invites applications for a pool of qualified temporary instructors to teach courses primarily in the History of Science (broadly defined) and Quantitative/Computational History should an opening arise. Screening of applicants is ongoing and will continue as needed. The number of positions varies from semester to semester, depending on the needs of the department. Positions may range from 16% to 100% time, which would translate to 1 to 6 courses over a two semester academic year.

The Department of History at the University of California, Berkeley, is generating an applicant pool of qualified instructors to teach courses in the History of Science, Technology, Medicine, Environment, or Quantitative/Computational History, pending openings.

Basic qualifications (at time of application): The minimum qualifications required to be an applicant are the completion of all PhD or equivalent degree requirements except the dissertation.

Additional qualifications (by start date): A PhD or equivalent degree in History of Science, Technology, Medicine, Environment, or Quantitative/Computational history, or related field, is required by the start date. Demonstrated teaching excellence in the appropriate fields with undergraduates and, where appropriate, graduate students, along with a record of accomplishment in scholarship, service and professional activity.

Salary range: $52,099 – $57,507, based on a two semester, 100% time appointment. Starting salary will be commensurate with degrees currently held, past college-level teaching experience, and relevant industry experience.

In addition to teaching responsibilities, general duties may include holding regular office hours, calculating grades, advising students, preparing course materials, managing GSIs, and attending appropriate meetings/orientations, etc.

Applicants whose research, teaching, or service has prepared them to contribute to our commitment to diversity and inclusion in higher education are encouraged to apply.

The department encourages individuals who may have had non-traditional career paths, may have taken time off for family reasons (e.g., children, disabled, or elderly), or have achieved excellence in careers outside academia (e.g., in professional or industry service) to apply. UC Berkeley has a number of policies and programs to support employees as they balance work and family.

To apply, please go to the following link: http://apptrkr.com/980154. Applicants must submit a cover letter to include fields of specialization, curriculum vitae, one sample syllabus, and two letters of recommendation.

Please indicate in bold in the first paragraph of your cover letter your area(s) of specialization noting time period, any regional emphasis and topical focus (History of Science, Technology, Medicine, Environment, Qualitative/Computational History, or if other, please specify specialization).

All letters will be treated as confidential per University of California policy and California state law. Please refer potential referees, including when letters are provided via a third party (i.e., dossier service or career center), to the UC Berkeley statement of confidentiality (http://apo.berkeley.edu/evalltr.html) prior to submitting their letters.

Applications will be initially reviewed from March through April 2017 for appointments during the 2017-2018 academic year, including Summer Sessions 2017, Fall 2017, and Spring 2018. Reviews will continue as needed throughout the year.

Please note: The use of a lecturer pool does not guarantee that an open position exists. See the review date specified in AP Recruit to learn whether the department is currently reviewing applications for a specific position. If there is no future review date specified, your application may not be considered at this time.

Questions about this position may be addressed to Professor Mark Brilliant, Vice Chair for Curriculum, Department of History (mbrill@berkeley.edu). Questions about the application process can be directed to Kimberly Bissell, Academic Personnel Coordinator, at history-ap@berkeley.edu.

The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. For the complete University of California nondiscrimination and affirmative action policy

see: http://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4000376/NondiscrimAffirmAct.

JOB LOCATION

Berkeley, CA

REQUIREMENTS

DOCUMENTS

Cover Letter to Include Fields of Specialization

Curriculum Vitae

One Sample Syllabus

REFERENCES

2 letters of reference required

http://apptrkr.com/980154

Calls for Papers: Network of Health and Environment

Network of Health and Environment of the European Social Science History Association Conference (ESSHC), at Belfast, 4-7 April 2018

 

Proposals are invited for panels, individual papers or sessions on any subject dealing with the social history of health and/or of the environment.

ESEH is trying to expand its range of approaches and methods, so proposals using innovative formats are very welcome. The following types of applications are encouraged:

  1. Traditional panels consisting of four contributors and one chair and discussant. We particularly encourage sessions organised around a central theme with a comparative approach, bringing together contributions on different regions and/or time periods. We reserve the right to re-arrange panels and contributors if necessary in view of incoming applications. Panel chairs can also act as discussants. Discussants have an important role in stimulating discussions, which should take up a substantial part of the panel time. They can identify central issues of the papers, point to similarities and differences, raise individual or general questions or otherwise broaden the perspective on the overall themes of the panels.
  2. Individual papers. Individual papers are welcome, and accepted papers will be arranged into coherent sessions as far as possible. However, pre-organized panels have a substantially higher chance of being accepted.
  3. Meet the Author sessions, organized around a recent and important book, discussed by several scholars. While the author should be able to respond, it must become clear in the proposal that such sessions should provide the opportunity for critical debate about seminal and/controversial books and their theses (instead of being marketing events for a book.)
  4. Round table discussions in which several experts discuss one central topic.
  5. Other, e.g. the presentation and discussion of a film, a new evolving project, or some “crazy format” which we have not yet thought of.

Regardless of form, all proposals must involve contributors at least from different institutions but generally from different countries and must include a section of interaction with the audience. Papers are to  be presented rather than read.

Proposals on topics from the entire range of environmental history and of the history of medicine and health are welcome. The following themes and approaches are particularly encouraged:

  • Interactions between the global, the regional and the local;
  • Connections between the past and the present;
  • Interdisciplinary approaches; please, contact the chairs of other networks;
  • Tensions between conflicting constructions of reality;
  • Themes highlighting the dynamics of decisions made with incomplete information;
  • Themes exploring policy repercussions across periods and regions.

The deadline is May 1, 2017, but early submissions are strongly encouraged

Visit http://www.iisg.nl/esshc for:

  • General information on the conference
  • The organising institution
  • Registration (including paper proposal procedures)

For questions, suggestions etc., please write to:

Iris Borowy: borowyiris@i.shu.edu.cn, College of Liberal Arts, Shanghai University and/or Enrique Perdiguero-Gil: quique@umh.es, History of Science, Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche (Alicante, España)

 

Grants: W. Bruce Fye Medical History Research Travel Grant

The W. Bruce Fye Center for the History of Medicine is pleased to announce its first annual W. Bruce Fye Medical History Research Travel Grant.  The grant is available to physicians, historians, medical students, graduate students, faculty members, and independent scholars who wish to use archival and library resources at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. The grant (up to $1,500 in one calendar year) may be used for transportation, lodging, food, and incidental expenses relating to the research project. It is available to residents of the United States and Canada who live more than 75 miles from Rochester.

The W. Bruce Fye Center for the History of Medicine houses archival collections that contain official records of the Clinic and its administrative offices, official and unofficial publications, departmental annual reports, committee minutes, photographic and moving images, sound recordings, personal papers, and memorabilia relating to the Mayo Clinic, its mission, programs, and people. To search our archival holdings, please visit our online catalog (MAX) (http://www.mayo.edu/mayo-clinic-libraries/resources/special-collections).

The W. Bruce Fye History of Medicine Library is a specialized library housing important collections in the history of medicine and allied sciences. Several thousand volumes of rare medical classics (from 1479) and early journal literature (from 1665) comprise the core collection of primary literature on all aspects of medicine and allied fields.  More recently published histories, biographies, facsimiles, and other support materials comprise the remainder of the collection of some 23,000 total volumes.  Special strengths include anesthesiology, cardiology, dermatology, immunology, ophthalmology and neurology.  The library also has a large collection of Mayo physician bound reprints.

Applicants should send by e-mail as attachments the items listed below to Renee Ziemer:
•       Abstract of your project (250 words) stating the general scope and purpose
•       How historical resources at Mayo Clinic will further your research
•       Abbreviated curriculum vitae (3 pages or less)
•       One letter of reference that includes comments on your project

Timeline for 2017 grant:
Application deadline (all materials): April 28, 2017
Successful applicant(s) will be notified by May 31, 2017
Visit(s) to Rochester must be completed by December 15, 2017

Contact information:
Renee Ziemer, coordinator, W. Bruce Fye Center for the History of Medicine & Mayo Historical Suite, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905; Telephone: (507) 284-2585; E-mail: ziemer.renee@mayo.edu

Calls for Papers: Patient Voices: Historical and Ethical Engagement with Patient Experiences of Healthcare, 1850-1948

PATIENT VOICES: Historical and Ethical Engagement with Patient Experiences of Healthcare, 1850–1948

An interdisciplinary, policy-focused symposium

New College, University of Oxford, 18–19 September 2017

In 1948, diverse health provisions in Britain were consolidated into a single, state-directed service. After almost seventy years of the NHS—the bedrock of modern welfare—there is great concern about any return to a mixed economy of healthcare. The proposed privatisation of health services is controversial because it threatens to destabilise the complex relationships of patients with medical professionals and the state. It calls into question the structure and accessibility of healthcare, as well as the rights of patients, both as medical consumers and sources of medical data. Yet these are questions that equally shaped the development of the NHS prior to its foundation. Historical perspectives on pre-NHS healthcare—perspectives that are increasingly informed by the experiences of patients—are fundamental to understanding not just the past but also the choices before us.

Social historians of medicine have responded in various ways to Roy Porter’s 1985 call for histories incorporating the patient view. But despite work across diverse fields, patient voices before 1948 are yet to be fully integrated into historical scholarship. This symposium brings together historians, medical ethicists and archivists with interdisciplinary expertise to explore questions relating to the accessibility and ethics of the study of patient voices and data in the specific context of pre-NHS provisions. Through research presentations, roundtable discussions and interactive sessions, participants will explore the collection and qualitative use of historical medical records. The symposium will focus on methodological issues by investigating a range of available archives and piloting new strategies for retrieving as-yet-unheard historical patient voices. It will also address ethical issues arising from these pilot strategies, including questions of data protection, informed consent and the implications of new technologies in storing and analysing information.

Following the symposium, participants will be invited to submit articles for a special issue.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers that address one or more of the following questions:

  • How should historians access and interpret the experiences of patients, particularly those with stigmatising conditions?
  • How can historians negotiate archival ‘silences’ when locating patient voices?
  • What can patient experiences tell historians about past, present and future interactions between healthcare consumers and providers?
  • How can the study of historical patient experiences inform the social, political and clinical dimensions of healthcare in the future?
  • What ethical considerations should inform the collection, maintenance and use of sensitive medical archives, including digitisation, data analytics and discourse analysis?
  • How can attention to these ethical considerations shape the study of healthcare and facilitate high-quality medical-humanities research?

Proposals should not exceed 300 words and should be accompanied by a short biography. Please submit them to Anne Hanley (University of Oxford) and Jessica Meyer (University of Leeds) at patientvoicesproject@gmail.com by 1 April 2017.

 

Calls for Papers: Taking Back Health: Health Tomorrow, Vol.5

Submission Deadline: May 15th, 2017

The fifth volume of Health Tomorrow: Interdisciplinarity and Internationality (HTII) explores the themes of anti-colonialism, decolonization, anti-racism, white supremacy, and the hegemony of the Global North to reveal broader conceptualizations of health and health determinants.

HTII seeks to gather original research and book reviews that question dominant health discourses by critically analyzing oppressive colonial processes and their  destructive legacies— legacies that continue to affect the health of individuals and communities.

Critical inquiries disrupt dominant understandings of health—dislodging approaches to healthcare from their epistemological, economic, institutional, demographic, and political centres. Often, this work is accomplished by making explicit the intersection of individual experiences, identities, and systems, as well as structures that interact simultaneously and on multiple levels.

Such critiques expose how health inequities and systemic injustices are embedded in conventional biomedical approaches, pathologies, and eurocentric conceptions of health and health services.

By mapping instances of health inequities and injustices onto broader socio-political territories, we can better understand the expression and interaction of multiple forms of oppression and discrimination. Critical investigations in this area have opened  up spaces for challenging dominant health discourses.

Resisting these discourses also means decentering conventional health narratives,  promoting emancipatory worldviews, and fostering more positive and contextualized health practices. Through destabilization, notions of health can become more dynamically responsive to context, power, privilege, and social location.

Possible areas and topics may include, but are in no way limited to:

  • Anti-colonial scholarship on health: Highlighting the imperialist role of the Global North in shaping notions of health (e.g., neoliberatlization of health services).
  • Decolonizing scholarship on health: Indigenous work to decolonize settler states (e.g. the decolonization of body, mind and spirit; Indigenous approaches to health; strategies for decolonizing health and medicine)
  • Critical race approaches to health: Black feminist scholarly traditions and approaches from the Global South (e.g. intersectional approaches to health; racism and anti-Black racism in medical research and practice;  anti-racism work in health service delivery and distribution; the relationship between Western medicine and non-Western medicine; integration as well as resistance to Western medicine)
  • Critical disability approaches to health: Perspectives that dismantle the ableist policies, assumptions and practices that marginalize or disadvantage different abilities (e.g., sociologies of impairment that shed light on the effects of colonialism)
  • Historical or long-term perspectives on health: Colonial or racist influence on beauty and ‘body shaming’ (e.g. racist cosmetic interventions, gender-confirmation surgeries and practices, cultural appropriations of beauty standards)
  • Reformulations or challenges to conventional notions of health: feminist applications of phenomenology such as subjectivity, identity, embodiment, intersectionality and everyday epistemology in relation to the body; health of individuals as dependant on their communities (e.g., pressure on new mothers to breastfeed).

Please send completed manuscripts (6000-10,000 words) tohtii@yorku.ca by May 15th, 2017

For further guidelines and instructions, please visit:http://ht.journals.yorku.ca

Fellowships: Postdoctoral Fellowship in the History of Medicine

The Department of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, seeks applicants for a one-year postdoctoral fellowship. The fellow will have teaching and administrative responsibilities in the department’s new online program in the history of medicine and protected time to pursue his or her research and writing. The successful candidate will have a proven record of teaching in the history of medicine, a strong research profile and excellent organizational skills. Experience with online teaching an asset. Candidates must have defended their PhD thesis by June 15, 2017. The term of appointment is one year, beginning July 1, 2017.

Closing date for applications: March 31, 2017.

If you have any questions about the position, please email Dr Graham Mooney at gmooney3@jhmi.edu

Full application details are available here.

Grants: Travel Fellowship in the History of Academic Health Center & Health Sciences at the University of Minnesota

Purpose: The Travel Fellowship in the History of the Academic Health Center & Health Sciences at the University of Minnesota is intended to promote research on post-World War II developments in academic health centers and health science research using the University of Minnesota Archives.  The University of Minnesota Program in the History of Medicine in conjunction with the Academic Health Center History Project (http://editions.lib.umn.edu/ahcarchives/) will offer up to two fellowships per year to interested scholars whose research is well suited to the health science and administrative collections in the University Archives. Where possible, preference will be given to early career scholars: graduate students in the research stage of their dissertation and recent Ph.D.s.

University of Minnesota Archives Holdings: The University of Minnesota Archives https://www.lib.umn.edu/uarchives house numerous collections related to the history of the Academic Health Center (AHC), its forerunning administrative configuration the College of Medical Sciences, and the records of the six schools and colleges that comprise the Academic Health Center:  medicine, nursing, public health, pharmacy, dentistry, and veterinary medicine. The Archives also house collections pertaining to interdisciplinary centers within the Academic Health Center and oral histories and personal papers of prominent faculty and administrators.

Finding aids for many of the collections at the University Archives can be found at http://special.lib.umn.edu/uarch/. Digital documents related to the AHC and University administration are available through the University of Minnesota Digital Conservancy at http://conservancy.umn.edu/. Applicants are encouraged to contact University Archivist Erik Moore at moore144@umn.edu to discuss the collections before applying.

Application and Expectations: Applicants must submit a curriculum vitae, names and contact information of two referees, a brief proposal of no more than two pages, and a one-page proposed budget. The one- to two-page proposal should outline clearly the purpose of the research and its central questions, what records or materials will be used, any bigger project of which this research is a part, and the intended product(s) such as a dissertation, publications, or documentaries. Selection of fellows will be based on the decision of a multi-disciplinary committee.

Fellowship recipients will be required to submit a short report on their research. Recipients are also required to supply the University Libraries with a copy of any publication resulting from research conducted as a result of the grant.

Duration and Support: The fellowship covers a flexible visit of between one to four weeks. The amount of the fellowship is up to $1,000.00 to support expenses related to travel, lodging, research costs, and other incidental expenses. The fellowship is available for a single, continuous research trip between the dates July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018.

Dates:

Deadline for applications is April 30, 2017. Candidates will be informed of the results by June 1, 2017.

Applications should be submitted via email. Be sure that your last name appears in the filename of each document. Send applications to: Dominique Tobbell, Program in the History of Medicine, University of Minnesota, dtobbell@umn.edu (612-626-5114). If you have any questions about the travel grant, please contact Dominique Tobbell.

Grants: Sandra L. Panther Fellowship in the History of Family Medicine

The Center for the History of Family Medicine (CHFM) invites applications for its Sandra L. Panther Fellowship in the History of Family Medicine.  Interested family physicians, residents, students, other health professionals, historians, scholars, educators, scientists and others are invited to apply.

The successful applicant will be awarded a fellowship grant in an amount of up to $2,000 to support travel, lodging and incidental expenses relating to research on a project of their choosing dealing with any aspect of the history of General Practice, Family Practice, or Family Medicine in the United States.

The deadline to apply is 5:00 p.m. CDT, Friday, March 31, 2016.  Complete fellowship rules, application forms, and instructions are available online through the Center’s website at the following link:

http://www.aafpfoundation.org/foundation/our-work/grants-awards/all/chfm-fellowship.html

For more information, please contact:
Don Ivey, MPA
Manager
Center for the History of Family Medicine
11400 Tomahawk Creek Parkway
Leawood, KS 66211
Telephone: (800) 274-2237, ext. 4420
Fax: (913) 906-6095
E-mail: chfm@aafp.org

Grants: Ferenc Gyorgyey Research Travel Award

The Medical Historical Library of the Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library at Yale University is pleased to announce its tenth annual Ferenc Gyorgyey Research Travel Award for use of the Historical Library: http://library.medicine.yale.edu/historical/us/grant

The Medical Historical Library, located in New Haven, Connecticut, holds one of the country’s largest collections of rare medical books, journals, prints, photographs, and pamphlets. Special strengths are the works of Hippocrates, Galen, Vesalius, Boyle, Harvey, Culpeper, Priestley, and S. Weir Mitchell, and works on anatomy, anesthesia, and smallpox inoculation and vaccination. The Library owns over fifty medieval and renaissance manuscripts, Arabic and Persian manuscripts, and over 300 medical incunabula.  The notable Clements C. Fry Collection of Prints and Drawings has over 2,500 fine prints, drawings, and posters from the 15th century to the present on medical subjects.  The library also holds a great collection of tobacco advertisements, patent medicine ephemera, and a large archive of materials from Harvey Cushing, one of the founding fathers of neurosurgery.

The 2017-2018 travel grant is available to historians, medical practitioners, and other researchers who wish to use the collections of the Medical Historical Library:  http://historical.medicine.yale.edu/.  There is a single award of up to $1,500 for one week of research during the academic fiscal year July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018.  Funds may be used for transportation, housing, food, and photographic reproductions. The award is limited to residents of the United States and Canada. Applicants will need to apply through our fellowship site:  https://yale.communityforce.com/Funds/Search.aspx, and upload a curriculum vitae and project description, including the relevance of the Medical Historical Library collections to the project, as well as provide two references attesting to the particular project. Preference will be given to applicants beyond commuting distance to the Medical Historical Library.  This award is for use of Medical Historical special collections and is not intended for primary use of special collections in other libraries at Yale.  Applications are due by Monday, MAY 1st, 2017.  They will be considered by a committee and the candidates will be informed by June 2nd, 2017.  Winners may be asked to do a blog post discussing their research.

The application period is now open!  Please apply online at: https://yale.communityforce.com/Funds/Search.aspx

Requests for further information should be sent to:

Melissa Grafe, Ph.D
Head of the Medical Historical Library and John R. Bumstead Librarian for Medical History
Harvey Cushing/John Hay Whitney Medical Library
Yale University
P.O. Box 208014
New Haven, CT 06520-8014
Telephone: 203- 785-4354
Fax: 203-785-5636
E-mail: melissa.grafe@yale.edu

Additional information about the Library and its collections may be found at: http://historical.medicine.yale.edu/