Lectures: Online CME in the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

The Department of the History of Medicine at Johns Hopkins is proud to introduce new online Continuing Medical Education modules that provide a historical perspective on issues of relevance to clinical practice today.

For more information on these CME modules entitled “Professionalism in Historical Context” and “History of Global Health,” visit https://www.hopkinshistoryofmedicine.org/content/online-cme-modules-history-medicine-0.

Calls for Papers: Medical Narratives of Ill Health

CALL FOR PAPERS

Humanities special issue: “Medical Narratives of Ill Health”

The field of literature and medicine has been steadily growing over the past four decades, solidifying itself as a vital component of the medical and health humanities. The intersection of literature and medicine enriches how we view issues of health, disease, and care, particularly in how we value the individual’s narrative of health and ill health to help with diagnosis, treatment, and the relationship between the practitioner and the patient. In an attempt to wade through the difficult terrain of defining disease and health, Kenneth Boyd provides the following medical definitions (adapted from Marshall Marinker’s earlier work): “Disease […] is the pathological process, deviation from a biological norm. Illness is the patient’s experience of ill health, sometimes when no disease can be found. Sickness is the role negotiated with society” (Boyd, 1997). What Boyd reveals about these definitions is that one allows for the individual’s experience of ill health (illness), while the other two rely on others’ perceptions of ill health. Thus, he concludes, a clear definition of disease (and even sickness) is elusive: “to call something a disease is a value judgement, relatively unproblematic in cases when it is widely shared, but more contentious when people disagree about it” (Boyd, 1997). This contentious space has widened during the modern medical era (early nineteenth century to the present day), as medical reliance on technology favors an objective identification of disease. However, literary works, through both personal accounts and fictional scenarios, challenge this singular narrative of disease and ill health provided by the medical community.

For this special issue of Humanities, we seek to explore how literature from the early nineteenth century to the present day engages with and challenges modern medical authority when it comes to understanding disease, illness, and sickness. Papers for this special issue of Humanities should focus on narratives—fictional and/or non-fictional (such as medical realism, science fiction, pathographies, medical reports, etc.)—that explore the contentious space of disagreement between medicine, society, and the individual. Authors might consider topics such as: disease as metaphor; social vs. medical definitions of disease; patient agency and individual experiences of illness; challenges to medical technology’s presumed objectivity; representations of contagion and/or public health—or any other topics that relate to better understanding literary representations of disease, illness, and/or sickness.

Articles should be no more than 8000 words, inclusive of notes. The deadline for submission of articles to the guest editor is January 10, 2019: please email articles directly to Amanda M. Caleb at acaleb@misericordia.edu. The deadline for final drafts is February 28, 2019, with expected puplication in early Summer 2019. Please consult the journal’s webpage for formatting instructions: http://www.mdpi.com/journal/humanities/special_issues/contagion. 

Dr. Amanda Caleb
Guest Editor

Contact Info: Dr. Amanda M. Caleb, Misericordia University
Contact Email: acaleb@misericordia.edu

Grants: Spring/Summer 2018 Travel Scholarship at Bernard Beck Medical Library, Washington University

The Bernard Becker Medical Library is now accepting applications for the Archives and Rare Books Spring/Summer 2018 travel scholarship.  Researchers living more than 100 miles from St. Louis are eligible to apply for this award of up to $1,000 to help defray the costs of travel, lodging, food, and other expenses associated with using our collections.  Information about Becker Library’s archival and rare book holdings can be found at becker.wustl.edu/arb.

For more information and to apply for the travel scholarship, please see the link below:

becker.wustl.edu/about/news/...

Congratulations ACLS Fellows

Congratulations to AAHM members recently award American Council of Learned Societies fellowships:

Evan Ragland – ACLS Fellowship Program
Assistant Professor, History, University of Notre Dame
Experimental Life: Medicine, Science, and the Emergence of a Culture of Experiment

Tamara Venit-Shelton – Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship for Recently Tenured Scholars
Associate Professor, History, Claremont McKenna College
Herbs and Roots: A History of Chinese Medicine in the United States

Adam Warren – ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship
Associate Professor, History, University of Washington
Postmortem Cesarean Operations and the Spread of Fetal Baptism in the Spanish and Portuguese Empires

Congratulations to AAHM Award Winners

The American Association for the History of Medicine honored the following individuals at its award ceremony on May 5, 2017 on the campus of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, TN as part of the 90th annual meeting:

Osler Medal: Christopher Sterwald, Duke University Medical School, for “Frosted Intellectuals: How Leo Kanner Constructed the Autistic Family”; First honorable mention:  Sarah Tapp, Emory University School of Medicine, for “’Mothers, Mongols, and Mores’: Physician Advice to Parents of Newborns with Down Syndrome in the Mid 20th Century; and Second honorable mention:  Matthew Edwards, University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine, for “Freedom House Ambulance Service: Race and the Rise of Emergency Medical Services, 1967-1975”

Shryock Medal: Wangui Muigai  ‘All My Babies: Black Midwifery and Health Training Films in the 1950s’, Princeton University, Program in History of Science; First honorable mention: Vicki (Fama) Daniel ‘Medical Identification and the Emergence of a Forensic Paradigm at the 1949 Noronic Disaster’, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Program in the History of Science, Medicine, and Technology; and Second honorable mention: Elaine La Fay “‘The slandered torrid zone”: Medicine, Botany, and Imperial Visions of the American Tropics along the US Gulf Coast, 1820-1840’, University of Pennsylvania, History and Sociology of Science Department

J. Worth Estes Prize: Anna E. Winterbottom, “Of the China Root: A Case Study of the Early Modern Circulation of Materia Medica.” Social History of Medicine 28 (2015): 22-44

Pressman-Burroughs Wellcome: Rachel Elder, University of Pennsylvania

George Rosen Prize: Marcos Cueto and Steven Palmer, Medicine and Public Health in Latin America: A History (Cambridge University Press, 2014)

Welch Medal: Johanna Schoen for her book, Abortion After Roe:  Abortion After Legalization (University of North Carolina Press, 2015)

Genevieve Miller Lifetime Achievement Award: Daniel Fox

The Garrison Lecturer for 2018: Julie Fairman, Professor of Nursing, Professor, Department of History and Sociology of Science, Chair, Department of Biobehavioral Health Sciences, Endowed Chair, Nightingale Professor in Honor of Nursing Veterans, Co-Director, RWJF Future of Nursing Scholars Program at the University of Pennsylvania

Medical Historians in the News: Congressional briefings on Zika

On September 12, 2016 AAHM Past President Margaret Humphreys (Josiah Trent Professor in the History of Medicine, Duke University) participated in congressional briefings on “Zika: Historic Parallels and Policy Responses,” sponsored by the National History Center of the American Historical Association. AAHM Council member Alan Kraut of American University introduced the session, and John McNeill of Georgetown University  was the co-presenter.  For more information and video of the presentation, visit: http://www.mehumphreys.com/dc-zika

AAHM Speakers’ Bureau

Do you like to talk to the media about the history of medicine?

Do you like to help independent investigators discover research materials related to our discipline?

Do you like speaking to the general public about our specialized field of history?

If so, AAHM wants you! AAHM has established a speakers’ bureau to connect our members with those interested in our special expertise in the history of medicine. Please consider signing up today and sharing your expertise with us.  Sign up by completing this form. Only names, contact information, and publication lists will be shared with those asking for a history of medicine specialist. The AAHM speakers’ bureau list will not be posted online, distributed in blast emails, or circulated on listservs.

AAHM News: New Pedagogy Section in the Bulletin

New Pedagogy Section in the Bulletin/Call for Syllabi

The Bulletin of the History of Medicine will be adding a three-part focus on pedagogy beginning with its 2016 volume. The spring issue will introduce a new journal section covering topics related to teaching in the history of medicine today. Along with the print section, the journal will debut a pedagogy blog, a more immediate and informal place for the history of medicine teaching community to share what has worked in their diverse classrooms. In addition, the Bulletin will be maintaining a syllabus archive, similar to the one previously hosted by the NLM. Interested contributors to the pedagogy section, blog, or syllabus archive should contact the Bulletin’s editors at bhm@jhmi.edu. Please send all syllabi as PDF files.

Teaching: Teaching the New Paradigm in Black Death Studies

A blog has just been posted describing the experiences of AAHM member Monica Green in teaching a new course on the global history of plague and the most catastrophic pandemic in human history, the Black Death: http://arc-medieval.blogspot.com/2015/08/teaching-new-paradigm-in-black-death.html. Green taught the course as a semester-long experiment in how to take the new genetics paradigm of Yersinia pestis studies (the organism that causes plague) and create rich historical narratives that could explain the genesis, spread, and effects of the the main plague pandemics in the past two millennia. The blog has links to various resources used throughout the course, as well as to the full syllabus, which is freely available online.